Roberto Polo Gallery

The Gallery will close for Easter on Sunday, April 16th, 2017;

Jan Vanriet

  • Samuel

Artist Statement

Vanriet is an oeuvre builder, in the fullest sense of the term—this can also be understood in a literary manner. Typical of the oeuvre builder is the tendency to construct a personal world in which many other worlds emerge, are soaked up and digested, and metamorphosed into something inalienably personal. Vanriet is automatically tributary to a whole range of historically suffused iconographic themes. He handles visual elements literally like a poet handles words: He arranges them, rearranges them, deletes, adds, revises, starts his pictorial phrase anew, tastes it, takes up themes at large intervals, interweaves motifs and metaphors, and relies, when push comes to shove, on the strength of intuition. Like a poet, he is in pursuit of an ambiguous whole that carries an impression of transparency while simultaneously eluding simple analysis. He is aware that the image itself, if it has been constructed carefully, always evokes more complex associations than schematic intentions. As one delves deeper, the connections become more impressive. Jan Vanriet is something of a contemporary Symbolist, a semiotician in paint, for whom each reference fits into a hermetical system, behind which he frequently attempts to secrete emotion and memory.
One might wonder what generations in a distant future will read into Vanriet’s paintings... These riddle-like works, in which our own actuality and the recent past have been so encoded, in which we must, every time, search for something that will break the code—a smudge on a watercolor, a meticulously copied stencil, a graphite drawing on an alkyd painting, or an ironic point in the title. Many of Vanriet’s paintings can make not only the future viewer, but also the contemporary one feel like a fool, unable to put the cryptic symbols in their rightful place. Yet his work presents itself initially as an inviting, visual play—now sensory and loose; now geometrical and abstract; now like a transparent historical reference; now like a pictorial riddle that releases its meaning in driblets to the viewer. Vanriet’s plastic strategies are very similar to text strategies, and the standard way to break open such systems of symbols is a kind of exegesis, a comparative textual study of the material.
Stefan Hertmans, 2000

  • Jan Vanriet | Painter of Words, by Benno Barnard | Knack.be

    3/4/2016

    Belgium

    Jan Vanriet: painter of words 04/03/16 In his latest collection of poems Moederland [Motherland], painter-poet Jan Vanriet argues with the twentieth century and with the present, in his own unique way, according to Benno Barnard. Doubly talented Jan Vanriet writes poetry with the same flexibility that is found in his paintings. © Hans Vercauter (Hollands Diep) In a utopian world, I would write about the poet Jan Vanriet without mentioning the painter Jan Vanriet, but that is sadly impossible, because there is no poetry or painting in that paradise. I have known Jan for years, and those years have become decades. In one of those years – 1997 according to my diary – he and I are on the steps of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, our home city at that moment, pointing. Behind us the nineteenth century, with its columns, adjectives and winged allegorical bronze on the roof; on the other side of the filled-in quays the MUHKA, the Museum of Contemporary Art Antwerp, then brand new. That is the other side we are pointing at. Suspect 'Aren't those Freudian names?' we tell each other. They illustrate an agonizing truth, namely that our century, soon to be over, has enthusiastically blown up the obvious link between art and aesthetics. Beauty is suspect. Jan is suspect, as his work is not conceptual, even though it is teeming with comments on history. A leading Belgian curator in visual arts does not appreciate him. Traditionalist, much too magnificently painted bourgeois art! That is how he characterises Vanriet's work to me. Where is the pain, the struggle, amice? And Jan Fabre wields the comical word combination 'terror of the eye'. But what is a depiction that does not want to be a depiction? What is a thought about the world worth if the world itself remains invisible? I have a deep-rooted aversion to conceptual pretence, produced by artists who can't paint. But I do love those conventional pictures by Jan Vanriet. Painter of the word Slightly earlier in the nineties, we made Volgens Johannes [According to John] together – a series of paintings by Jan following the gospel according to John, to which I added a long poem-in-poems, De schipbreukeling [The castaway]. In this, I refer to my friend – without mentioning his name – as 'the painter of the word'. The word: in or on many of Jan Vanriet's paintings and drawings there are words, just as in Brueghel's and Magritte's. In his case they usually refer to a historical context. But I am running ahead of things – even though running ahead of things is an excellent way of discerning the historical connection between things. What I really wanted to say: he has quite recently published an important collection of poems, in which he argues with the twentieth century and with the present, thinks about thinking, ruminates on love and portrays an alter ego with sweet mockery: In onze voorraadkast liggen muizen met hun pootjes omhoog verwijt de vrouw de man Die klapt het boek dicht en zwijgt achter zijn bril Hij beaamt wat hij las bij Joseph Roth: de beurzen van de wereld bepalen de moraal van de maatschappij Maar dat zegt hij haar niet Hij wil beleggen in bloembollen en geloven in de muntwaarde van roos en hyacint Zwakkeling, denkt hij - door mijn schuld door mijn allergrootste schuld Niet wankelen, vermaant hij – ieder ongelukkig gezin is op bijzondere wijze ongelukkig Hij wil rechtop staan met de hakken in het zand Eerder een zoon van verdriet zo voelt hij zich, hij die koortsig een opening zoekt die ten onder gaat in een storm van zwarte pionnen Toren geofferd Dame kwetsbaar op het veld van diagonalen Laat de tijd maar lopen: de sluipschutter aan de overkant weigert een milde overgave In our pantry mice lie with their feet up the woman chides the man He shuts the book and remains silent behind his glasses He confirms what he read in Joseph Roth: the markets of the world determine the morals of society But he does not tell her that He wants to invest in bulbs and to believe in the currency of rose and hyacinth Weakling, he thinks - through my fault through my most grievous fault Do not falter, he scolds - All happy families are alike each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way He wants to stand up dig his heels in the sand More like a son of sorrow he feels, he who feverishly seeks a way who succumbs in a gale of black pawns Sacrificed rook Queen vulnerable on the field of diagonals Let time run: the sniper on the other side refuses a mild surrender The blood-veined stone passing for my heart always warms again on those rare occasions when I come across so poignant, so true a poem, a serendipitous poem to boot, this Aan zet [Your move], because I was not looking for it, it came across me. I quote it in full, not to bulk up my article, but because it is an important poem, quite telling about Vanriet and about an entire generation. Here is the poet-painter-husband in his Antwerp, Belgian, international salon, in the company of Roth, Tolstoy, Elsschot and his wife, calling himself 'a son of sorrow', and I suspect he does not just mean that in the figurative sense, being the son of a father linked with the biggest sorrow in modern history. Embracing melancholy Also in De schipbreukeling [The castaway] chess is used as a metaphor: it expresses the impossibility of controlling life. In a sense, that is what the entire collection is about: you may cling to all kinds of things – politics, philosophy, love, faith – but eventually you cannot do much more than embrace melancholy and cherish your memories. About politics: Jan Vanriet's father was put in the Mauthausen concentration camp as a Communist. Jan has not told me much about it, but I gather that this 'indirect horror' (if I may put it like that) has been the determining factor in his artistic calling. In the darkroom of my memory, I slide a negative in a tray of fluid, and two ghostly contours fill with the flesh and blood of Jan and Benno, on a trip together to the only-just-still-Communist Czechoslovakia in 1988; in Mariánske Lázne – the historic spa town – we visited old Peppi, who had survived Mauthausen with Jan's father. He had gone back, so he told us, and had sat in the deepening twilight listening to the chirping of summer insects: 'Das waren die Toten.' [Those were the dead.] The Habsburg Empire still rang in his German. The father and the camp do not feature directly in Moederland. But big history is constantly present; a background that sometimes, as with a spectacular scene change, comes to the foreground large as life, as in the poem Rode plein [Red square], in which Lenin's mausoleum is featured as 'the brothel of ideology' – not one of the usual theatre props in modern Dutch-language poetry. But the strongest poem about ideology, politics and history must be Droge naald [Dry needle], and that is, strangely enough, about a famous colleague-painter whom nobody would associate with politics: Waterval in een ets van Hercules Seghers Geknakte boom scheur in de wolken bundels aarzelend licht over de ruïne van een abdij en de gelouterde wandelaar rechts van een ravijn Waterfall in an etching by Hercules Seghers Snapped tree tear in the clouds shafts of hesitant light on the ruins of an abbey and the chastened wayfarer to the right of an abyss This chastened wayfarer: is that not him, is that not me? Almost fifty years after the year of the Cardinal Principles, people with common sense take care to keep a safe distance from that abyss, unlike certain brothers and sisters in art, who like to accuse them of having become 'rightist', a political position that is known to be insufferable. We were talking about it the other day, he and I, at a richly laden table, sipping a conservative Bordeaux, how ridiculous it is for us, apologists of human rights and humanitarianism, with some leftist extremists ... Anyway, I am digressing, even though digressing is the only way to get to the point, at least in my case. Sniper Moederland: no, this title (a leftist title!) is no coincidence; the necessary poems are autobiographical fragments about the mother – they are among the most emotional in the collection. Death, that sniper, stands in between her and him, and all that remains are stories to slow time down, because Ach, und im demselben Flusse Schwimmst du nicht zum zweitenmal Ah, and in the same river You don't swim a second time as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe says on one of the first pages of the collection. I suddenly remember now, that in Mariánske Lázne, almost thirty years ago, we were talking about the Geheimrat: Jan knew the old scoundrel, already in his eighties, had chased a fifteen-year-old baroness there. But eroticism... that is as big a trap as political conviction, though the bottom is softer if you fall into it. Sometimes it even offers consolation, albeit briefly: De melancholie van het orgasme duurt hooguit 10 seconden (terwijl het grommende varken dertig minuten lang van zijn hoogtepunt geniet) The melancholy of orgasm lasts 10 seconds at most (while the grunting pig enjoys its climax thirty minutes long) That is what it says in Prediker [Ecclesiastes], a verse about that book of the Bible admired by Jan Vanriet. Indeed, even though faith does not escape his scepticism, he does not join in the childish lamenting of his peers about the wickedness of the average cleric in your childhood, who would, by definition and out of sheer lust for power, feel your pecker, etc. It is no coincidence that he described John as 'a wonderful text' when he suggested making the book. Friendship Melancholy and memories: we do not have much more. A bit of self-mockery. Ten seconds once in a while. A glass of something. Friendship that is like-mindedness, because as he says in Over de methode [On the method]: Onze vriendschap is geen piramidespel Our friendship is not a pyramid scam Yet having said all this, having stressed the melancholy, the final poem Iconoclasme reminds me of the critical sense with which Vanriet talks about all ideology, not just that of his childhood. In that final poem about our present, filled with terrifying religiosity, he says: Wij kijken omhoog smeken de afwezige om een aanwijzing: een woord dat splijt een teken dat voorgeeft, verlicht We look up beg the absent for a clue: a word that splits a sign that pretends, enlightens But then what do you expect? This poet does not just happen to call on the sad, sarcastic Jew Joseph Roth to be his witness. Benno Barnard

  • Jan Vanriet | The Music Boy, by Roger Pierre Turine | La Libre

    3/4/2016

    Belgium

  • Jan Vanriet | A Book of Memories | Capital Arte

    3/1/2016

    Spain

    A BOOK OF MEMORIES In capital-arte · March 1, 2016 WALSALL THE NEW ART GALLERY The Belgian painter and poet Jan Vanriet is the absolute protagonist of this exhibition, replete with his personal experiences and universal concerns. Vanriet has previously represented his country at the biennials of São Paulo, Venice and Seoul, but this is his first solo exhibition in the United Kingdom. Love, loss, identity and destiny are the themes that alternate and complement each other in his compositions, which focus exclusively on his family history and on World War II. "While I 'm painting, my concerns are the colours, composition and aesthetics of the subject. But the story I am telling is about who I am. I cannot keep away from that" is how Vanriet defines his own work. His is a road spangled with images, repeated to clear the cobwebs from his own fading memory, using various media and in any thematic variations imaginable. The show's epicentre, The Music Boy, is in fact a quadriptych representing the painter's grandmother and his uncle (his mother's twin brother) as a child, playing the accordion, before the war. His family history reveals itself to the spectator as a book of memories sprinkled with actual, universal themes such as the shortcomings of this world, rampant with inhumanity, corruption and abuses of power. These memories of a childhood transport us to a new, contemporary way of describing the world. B.R.

  • Jan Vanriet | 'Painting against forgetting' | by Eric Rinckhout, H Art

    2/11/2016

    Belgium

    Jan Vanriet impresses in The New Art Gallery Walsall, Birmingham Painting against forgetting After the British Museum’s Print Cabinet bought a number of paintings by his hand, Jan Vanriet now presents his first exhibition in the United Kingdom. The Antwerp painter impresses with a vulnerable exhibition in The New Art Gallery Walsall in Birmingham. Walsall is considered the best regional museum outside London and is well-known for its unconventional selections. Eric RINCKHOUT It is no coincidence that the exhibition ‘The Music Boy’ starts with ‘Wounded Hand’, a new (2015) painting. It is a powerful graphic work in which Jan Vanriet has painted the palm of a left hand in the purest way, almost comic-like; in the middle we see a shining wound with a few streaks of dried blood. It is the hand of Christ, a detail from ‘Christ Crowned With Thorns’ (ca. 1470) by Flemish primitive Dieric Bouts, but Vanriet manages to lend the image a universal meaning, detached from the religious context, against an anonymous, yellow-grey background. The injured hand, in Vanriet’s depiction, stands for Man, the vulnerable and – in the course of history – so often wounded person. Across from ‘Wounded Hand’ hangs ‘Song of Destiny’, for which Vanriet sought inspiration in a 1915 sculpture by Wilhelm Lehmbruck. The fallen warrior is reduced by Vanriet to his essence: a frail figure that can hardly right its bloodied back. Not a hero, but a victim. In the sober, high spaces of The New Gallery Walsall, daylight enters silkily to rest on the thirty paintings by Jan Vanriet, enhancing the fragile nature of the paint. The hanging arrangement has a nice rhythm to it: some works get ample space, some others huddle closely together, such as the seven portraits of Holocaust victims. Working from passport photos taken before the fatal transport from the Dossin barracks in Mechelen, Belgium, Jan Vanriet grants these people a new life. As the painter applies different styles and colours, widely different paintings are created. Each portrait is a sign of life, but only a life in paint; that is all the painter can do. Painting is necessary but futile. A song of sorrow and melancholy sounds in Vanriet’s masterful paintings. Art vs. poverty in Walsall The New Art Gallery Walsall on the outskirts of Birmingham is an excellent museum, built in 2000 by Caruso St John, the architectural firm that designed, among others, Nottingham Contemporary and a few branches of Gagosian. Walsall itself is a tired Victorian town, once famous for its car and leather industry, but now an economically run-down area in the Midlands. The New Art Gallery was built in an attempt to revive the community through culture. The museum, free for visitors, focuses on a strong educational programme and varied exhibitions. Besides Jan Vanriet, there is an interesting exhibition on of the young British painter Laura Lancaster (°1979). The permanent collection was donated in 1973 by the widow of sculptor Jacob Epstein, and contains drawings, sculptures and smaller works by, among others, Constable, Bonnard, Van Gogh and Epstein himself. As Epstein’s youngest daughter was married to Lucian Freud for a while, the collection contains some remarkable works by his hand. From 11 February, the gallery hosts Tate. MEMORIES ‘The Music Boy’ is an exhibition soaked in melancholy and loss. What remains of a person: fading memories, a few ever harder-to-place photos, a few objects that have irrevocably lost their original context. Indeed, Jan Vanriet paints against time and against forgetting. On the one hand, there are the memories that unavoidably impose themselves on him. (‘Memory is like a dog that lies down wherever it wants’, Cees Nooteboom wrote in his novel ‘Rituals’). On the other hand, Vanriet also shows the pitfalls of memory and the unreliability of the photos he found. Take, for instance, the poliptych ‘The Contract’: eleven paintings, based on an old black-and-white photo of Vanriet's mother and father dancing in a warm embrace. But is that really what we see? Is the father smiling or grimacing? Is he holding his wife tenderly, or restraining her? Why is he smoking – is that inconsiderate? Is he stepping on her foot deliberately? Is she fending him off? Jan Vanriet paints the same image again and again, but with changing colours and accents, sometimes happy, sometimes sad. The past is impenetrable and full of unanswered questions. There is also the mother’s golden bracelet, which Jan Vanriet depicts as a monumental architectural construct, an arena of memories, at the same time indestructible and unattainable. Then there is the four-painting poliptych ‘The Music Boy’: a song of nostalgia. Working from an old photo, Vanriet paints his grandmother and her son, who is playing the accordion in an idyllic landscape. Those are images of simplicity and harmony, a scene occurring before the great drama of WWII. Yet in one work, shades of grey dominate, and faces blur. Maybe Jan Vanriet is painting the hankering for a time that never was. Or as the British art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon writes in the excellent catalogue: ‘The past does not become tangible, it has become a shadow play.’ The two most recent, monumental paintings ‘Horse’ (2015) are also a shadow play. A woman and a man – recognisable as the painter and his wife – are playing ‘horse’, as if they are participating in a pantomime, but without the usual costume. The one painting is purely graphical; the other has the monumentality of Piero della Francesca. Both canvases feature a deafening silence, in spite of the playful subject. Jan Vanriet is showing an almost childish role-play, the eternal ‘human comedy’. Outside the frame, time and the human tragedy play out. Painting is necessary but futile. A song of sorrow and melancholy sounds in Vanriet’s masterful paintings. ‘Jan Vanriet, The Music Boy’ until 8 May in The New Art Gallery Walsall. www.thenewartgallerywalsall.org.uk. Catalogue with texts by Andrew Graham-Dixon, Martin Herbert and Charlotte Mullins.

  • JAN VANRIET | ‘In Antwerpen loop ik op wolkjes’ BY JAN VAN HOVE | DE STANDAARD

    7/18/2015

    Belgium

    De Standaard : zaterdag 18 ; zondag 19 juli 2015 Jan Vanriet In deze reeks neemt een kunstenaar ons mee naar zjin favoriete uitzicht. De plaats waar hij zich goed voelt, tot rust komt, zichzelf heruitvindt. Vandaag : Jan Vanriet in de buurt van het Mechelseplein in Antwerpen. ‘In Antwerpen loop ik op wolkjes’ Het werk van Jan Vanriet heeft de wind in de zeilen. Hij begon het jaar met een opgemerkte tentoonstelling in Moskou, exposeert deze zomer in Gdansk en is volgend jaar te gast in Londen en Birmingham. ‘De tijd dat figuratieve schilderkunst passé was, is gelukkig voorbij.’ JAN VAN HOVE Jan Vanriet (Antwerpen, 1948) is een kunstenaar die graag thuiskomt. Een beetje zoals Odysseus na al zijn omzwervingen weer thuiskwam op Ithaca. Maar voor Vanriet is ‘thuis’ gewoon Antwerpen. En in de eerste plaats is het de buurt waar hij woont, met het Mechelseplein, de Sint-Jorispoort en het uitzicht op de rijzige toren van de kathedraal. ‘Het besef van het verleden is in Antwerpen buitengewoon sterk’, zegt hij. ‘Thomas More heeft in deze stad rondgelopen. Albrecht Dürer woonde er en probeerde hier zonder veel succes zijn tekeningen aan de man te brengen. Wie een beetje historisch inlevingsvermogen heeft, loopt in Antwerpen op wolkjes.’ Wat maakt precies deze buurt in het centrum van de stad voor u zo bijzonder ? ‘Er zijn wel meer plekken waar ik een sterke band mee heb en waar ik me mentaal thuis voel. Het stadsplein van Siena, bijvoorbeeld, of het kuuroord Marienbad, of de stad van Goethe : Weimar. Het zijn plaatsen die een rijke culturele erfenis bewaren en waar ik persoonlijke herinneringen aan heb. Maar het oude Antwerpen is de thuishaven van waaruit ik de wereld bekijk.’ ‘Na elke reis kom ik op dit Mechelseplein even poolshoogte nemen. Waar je ook kijkt, zie je hier ankerplaatsen voor het geheugen. Achter mij staat de Sint-Joriskerk, waar de jonge flamingant Paul Van Ostaijen in 1917 een rel uitlokte met kardinaal Mercier – een actie waarvoor hij de gevangenis in vloog. Dicht bij elkaar zie je hier ook het Maagdenhuis met zijn mooie collectie Vlaamse kunst, de woning van de schrijver en politicus Filips van Marnix van Sint-Aldegonde, het Museum Mayer van den Bergh waar de Dulle Griet van Bruegel hangt… En wat verder ligt de Leopoldplaats, op de plaats waar vroeger vorsten en landvoogden hun Blijde Intrede in de stad hielden.’ Gaat u graag op reis ? ‘Ik ben geen globetrotter. Liever dan verre landen te bezoeken, blijf ik in Europa, maar zelfs daar heb ik nog blinde vlekken, zoals Sevilla. Op reis gaan om te luieren, zegt mij weinig. Ik moet een doel hebben : een museum dat ik wil bezoeken, of een tentoonstelling die ik moet opstellen. Ik ben momenteel volop aan het werken aan een reeks schilderijen over baders en baadsters. Dat is een interessant thema in de kunst, denk maar Cézanne of Renoir. Voor die reeks reis ik weleens naar een museum in het buitenland om werken te gaan bekijken. Ik geniet over het algemeen meer van een goed gestoffeerde museumcollectie dan van tijdelijke tentoonstellingen waar massa’s volk op afkomt.’ Kunst is een belangrijk deel van uw leven. Wist u dat al vroeg ? ‘Ik schilderde al toen ik acht jaar was. In de familie van mijn vader zaten artistieke genen, maar meer op muzikaal gebied dan op dat van de beeldende kunst. Ik had het geluk dat een verstandige onderwijzer mij van in het begin aanmoedigde. En dat mijn ouders me naar de Academie lieten gaan. Helaas vond ik dat daar bij de schilders een stoffige en oubollige boel, en wilde ik er zo vlug mogelijk weg.’ ‘Het meest dank ik aan een galerie die mij als jonge kunstenaar kansen heeft gegeven. Lens Fine Art had in de jaren zeventig en tachtig een groot netwerk en exposeerde bekende kunstenaars zoals Pierre Alechinsky, Antonio Saura en Pierre Klossowski. De galerie geloofde in mijn werk en wees mij de weg. Dat is veel waard als je aan het begin van je loopbaan staat.’ U schildert en tekent niet alleen, u hebt ook veel geschreven en gedichten gemaakt. Zo’n dubbeltalent is veeleer zeldzaam. Hoe groeit zoiets ? ‘Schilderen komt voor mij op de eerste plaats, maar ik schrijf ook graag. Na mijn studies heb ik enkele jaren wat bijverdiend als journalist, met lange interviews voor tijdschriften als Avenue of Panorama. Ik denk daar met plezier aan terug. Het was de tijd dat men oog begon te krijgen voor human interest, voor de mens achter de politicus of de zakenman. Het aardige was dat ik figuren met heel verschillende achtergronden kon interviewen. De ene week praatte ik met de orkestleiderder James Last, de andere week met wielerkampioen Jean-Pierre Monseré of met de directeur van Sabena. Ik volde mij daar goed bij, maar toen ik merkte dat ik door dat schrijven te weinig tijd overhield om te schilderen, ben ik er radicaal me gestopt.' Wat vindt u in het schrijven dat het schilderen u niet kan bieden ? ‘ik heb net een dichtbundel klaar die volgend jaar zal verschijnen en die ik Vaderland genoemd heb. Tijdens het schrijven merkte ik opnieuw dat je in gedichten op een meer genuanceerde manier kwijt kunt hoe je tegen de wereld aankijkt dan in schilderijen. Woorden zijn specifieker en concreter dan een beeld. Bij een schilderij kunnen de interpretaties gemakkelijker verschillen van toeschouwer tot toeschouwer. Schrijven en schilderen zijn twee verschillende media, dat moet je aanvaarden. Ze zijn ook niet inwisselbaar, al kun je in allebei eenzelfde idee of gevoel proberen uit te drukken.’ Zijn er kunstenaars of schrijvers die een grote betekenis voor u hebben gehad? ‘Ja, er zijn er heel wat. Op dat punt ben ik nogal ontrouw. Maar misschien steekt Picasso toch boven alle anderen uit. Het talent en de vindingrijkheid van die man moeten verzengend geweest zijn. Het is niet alleen de kwaliteit van zijn werk waar ik voor val. Ook zijn bijna filmische leven, zijn doordringende blik, en de romantiek van de avant-garde waarvan hij de leider was, vind ik heel imponerend. Wat ik van Picasso geleerd heb, is dat je altijd nieuwe wegen moet verkennen in plaats van te herhalen wat je vroeger al gedaan hebt.’ U hebt ook Hugo Claus goed gekend. ‘Die had wel iets van Picasso. Ook hij bezat een enorme dosis branie en bravoure, en ook hij had het vermogen van een alchemist om uit een prul goud te toveren. Maar Hugo was voor mij veel meer dan een grote kunstenaar. Hij was een vriend. Ik heb hem vijftien jaar lang wekelijks een paar keer gezien. Dat was een gelukkige periode in mijn leven.' 'Natuurlijk had ik zijn boeken al veel vroeger gelezen. Als tiener keek ik naar hem op als naar een jonge god. Claus wrikte aan de gevestigde orde en die balorigheid sprak mij als adolescent aan. Toen ik hem leerde kennen, merkte ik dat hij zijn indrukwekkende status compenseerde met veel charme en generositeit. Hij kon heel eenvoudig zijn. Het was voor mij als schilder een genoegen om hem over kunst te horen praten, of om hem met Chinese inkt en penseel vliegensvlug iets op papier te zien zetten. Over mijn eigen werk sprak ik uit schroom niet met hem, maar toen hij een doek van mij kocht, besefte ik dat hij het apprecieerde.’ Hoe kijkt u terug op uw loopbaan ? Hoe verklaart u het succes dat uw werk de jongste jaren te beurt valt ? 'Ik kijk niet graag terug. Ik ben nog volop aan het werk en kijk liever vooruit. Ik voel dat ik mijn werk met de jaren steeds beter onder de knie krijg. En ik kreeg in de voorbije jaren ook een goede professionele ondersteuning van mijn Brusselse galerie, Roberto Polo, die een uitstekend netwerk heeft. Via hen kwam ik bijvoorbeeld in contact met een Russische verzamelaar die ervoor zorgde dat mijn werk in Moskou werd getoond.' 'Ik heb in mijn loopbaan een slingerbeweging ondervonden. Er was een periode dat mijn werk het moeilijk had. De figuratieve schilderkunst die ik beoefen, en waar ik aan gehecht ben, was niet langer bon ton. Het waren de hoogdagen van de conceptuele kunst. De jongste jaren merk ik dat de slinger terugkomt. Ik krijg nu zelfs mails van jonge schilders die geïnteresseerd zijn in wat ik maak.' 'Enkele ijkpunten in mijn loopbaan waren belangrijk voor mij. De tentoonstelling Closing time, waarmee het Museum voor Schone Kunsten van Antwerpen in 2010 zijn deuren sloot voor renovatie, was zo'n moment. Ik kreeg toen de kans een selectie uit de Antwerpse museum-collectie te maken en raakpunten te zoeken met mijn eigen werk. Ook tentoonstelling Gezichtsverlies in Kazerne Dossin in Mechelen was zo'n uitschieter. Daar hingen schilderijen die gebaseerd waren op pasfoto's van mensen die vanuit ons land gedeporteerd werden naar de concentratiekampen. Ze raakten een snaar bij het publiek.' Het valt op dat u heel uiteenlopende thema's aanpakt. U schildert evengoed een stuk rauw vlees als Mickey Mouse als een nachtgezicht van Berlijn. Is er iets wat dat allemaal verbindt ? 'Mijn werk is autobiografisch. Het gaat niet alleen over wat ikzelf heb meegemaakt, maar over alles wat mij bezighoudt. Dat rode vlees verwijst naar de traditie van het vanitasstilleven uit de oude Vlaamse en Hollandse schilderkunst, die ik bewonder. Andere schilderijen gaan terug op boeken die een diepe indruk op mij maakten, of op het levensverhaal van mijn familie. Zoals alle mensen ben ik op zoek naar betekenis in mijn leven. Mijn werk is daarbij een hulpmiddel.' Volgt u de hedendaagse kunst? Voelt u zich ermee verbonden ? 'Laten we zeggen : ik volg vanop afstand. Maar ik ga vooral mijn eigen gang. Ik haal meer informatie uit artikelen in kranten en tijdschriften dan uit het afschuimen van vernissages in de galeries. Ik probeer ook verder te kijken dan de beeldende kunst. Ik lees veel en ga graag naar theater of naar een mooie operavoorstelling. Kunst is niet het hele leven, bedoelt u dat ? 'Goethe zei ooit dat zijn schrijverschap ondergeschikt moest zijn aan het leven. Ik heb dat gevoel soms ook. Maar kunst is een motor die je drijft. Het zit in je, je kan het niet beheersen. Als ik een tijd niet creatief ben, of dat niet op zijn minst probeer te zijn, word ik nukkig en onrustig. Kunst heeft me al zoveel intellectuele verrijking geschonken, zoveel gelukkige momenten. De ontroering die kunst soms opwekt, overvalt je plots en maakt je weerlos. Ik zal de enige niet zijn die bij het beluisteren van mooie muziek zijn tranen niet kan bedwingen.' 'Wat ik van Picasso geleerd heb, is dat je altijd nieuwe wegen moet verkennen in plaats van te herhalen wat je vroeger al gedaan hebt.' 'Er was een periode dat mijn werk het moeilijk had. In de hoogdagen van de conceptuele kunst was de figuratieve schilderkunst niet bon ton.' ’Na elke reis kom ik op dit Mechelseplein even poolshoogte nemen.’ ã Wouter Van Vaerenbergh ' Liever dan verre landen te bezoeken, blijf ik in Europa' ã Wouter Van Vaerenbergh

  • Jan Vanriet | SCHILDER MET VERVE', by mark Schaevers | HUMO

    6/9/2015

    Belgium

    EN 'Thanks to Luc Tuymans, figurative art is a possibility once again. I should offer him a nice treat one of these days' Jan Vanriet PAINTER CON BRIO Yesterday, Jan Vanriet was in the Polish city of Gdansk where he opened a retrospective. Tomorrow, he drives to France to empty his second home - sold! Today, in his Antwerp studio, he shows me paintings which he is working on for an exhibition in London. "For the time being, I have no intention of going on holiday,", says the painter-poet. Did he ever intend to be busier than ever before at 67 years of age? "No, until a few years ago, the idea was: that's all there is, what is left is to age with dignity, enjoying the south. Now I know: there is more to come." Mark Schaevers / Photographs Johan Jacobs HUMO: The buzz is: Jan Vanriet is doing well. Do you think so yourself? Jan Vanriet: "Yes, I have the feeling to be in a flow, like an athlete in good shape. Athletes have peaks over short periods that have to be phased out again; with me it has been going on for a few years, and it isn't ending yet." HUMO: But you do not use dope? Vanriet: "The interest shown in you is a kind of doping. For over two years now, I have been working with the gallerist Roberto Polo in Brussels, and this man has brought a dynamic into my life. He is the gallerist whom I have always dreamt of: when I call him, he immediately comes to have a look and that is very stimulating. He has excellent international contacts and that also stimulates one. Contrary to what many people think, I'm not a very successful networker. I have always been fortunate that many things just kind of happened to me. Almost 45 years ago, I started working with Adriaan Raemdonck of De Zwarte Panter (The Black Panther) just because we studied together at the academy. He wisely decided to stop painting, because he thought others did it better. And at once it was logical that I took my first steps with him. And then it was the poet Hugues C. Pernath, a friend and a difficult person, incidentally, who, behind my back, went to talk to Jan Lens, who at that time owned the most important gallery in the country, and he piloted me in there." HUMO: But that luck didn't last. You experienced lesser times when conceptual art started to dominate the scene: not your thing. Vanriet: "I admit that I prefer to look at a traditional artistic expression rather than at a piece of cloth on a brick floor. That just doesn't touch me so much. An installation is quickly taken in by me; in my mind that's something for window dressers. Maybe that's the Prince Charles in me (laughs). In the 80s and 90s there was an overkill of conceptual art. Figurative painting was seen as a superannuated act, you simply didn't do THAT anymore! You had to deal with the new media and develop a new approach: most of all there had to be a lot of explaining, there had to be a lot of text on the wall. You can imagine that in such a climate, I was put in the trash container. But I am a comeback kid!" HUMO: You were also led to the garbage can by the then reigning art pope Jan Hoet? Vanriet: "It is no secret that I had only negative experiences with Hoet. My effect on him was that of a red flag on a bull. One day, he visited a collector, was delighted by all which he saw until a new Vanriet appeared: he then stormed to his raincoat and left the building in a fury. Another time he explained in an interview why the German painter, Walter Dahn, could not be part of his Documenta: 'he makes me think too much of Jan Vanriet!' I have been 'kaltgestellt' (sidelined), that's the right word, by Hoet and his acolytes, who are still occupying desks in stuffy offices here and there. I felt I was slipping away into a samizdat position (after the clandestine publishing houses in the former Eastern Bloc countries which distributed printed materials forbidden by the state, ed.). Those poor artists behind the Iron Curtain were very much admired in those days! But here the same thing was happening. The extremism directed against figurative art was far more severe here than in the neighbouring countries. They had more museums and thus exhibition possibilities. We barely had museums - to this day we only have three - and a few museum curators made their mark on them. Quite a few people have been 'killed' at that time." HUMO: Am I to understand this literally? Vanriet: "In the region of Ghent there were painters who put an end to their lives. Witness the tragic fates of Marc Maet and Philippe Vandenberg (the first committed suicide in 2000, the second in 2009, ed.). It also had to do with the ways in which those museum curators would be blowing hot and cold: first they were enthusiastic about an artist, subsequently they totally ignored the artist of their former enthusiasm. Many painters have known quite serious depressions." HUMO: But not Jan Vanriet? Vanriet: "I would at times be fretting in my studio. The annoying thing is that you can hardly react, because then it's you who is the envious piece of chagrin. I kept my mouth shut and stayed away from the art world, the courts and their courtiers, the obligatory conversations at openings. You will never see me at an opening of any museum." HUMO: Seeking some support from colleagues can make you feel better, no? Vanriet: "You don't have colleagues in the art world. I barely noticed really sincere solidarity amongst artists. Julian Barnes recently stated in De Standaard newspaper that he grew up with the naive idea that artists became better people because they were constantly busy with art. He came back on that view (little laugh)." DEATH CAMP LOVE HUMO: You are a loner and you never joined up with a group. Vanriet: "Is that kind of forming of groups not something of the past? Somewhat back in time artists wrote manifestos." HUMO: And today they write invoices? Vanriet: "Exactly - you're too quick for me. However swollen and silly those manifestos, after all they were written. A group also offered a sense of protection in difficult times: artists tried to lift each other out of poverty. Take group Zero where Ivo Michiels and Jef Verheyen had contacts. I knew them well, I know how inexpensively they organised their trips to Milan, all the people who offered them to stay for free at their homes. Now there is more money in circulation and artists meet each other under very different circumstances." HUMO: Figurative painters also do profit from the flowering of the visual arts. Vanriet: "The attitude towards figurative art is completely reversed, and in our region, we largely have to thank someone like Luc Tuymans for it. I have to offer Luc a treat one of these days! For me such a turning point came around the year 2000, when Lieven Storme - meanwhile vanished again from the art world - started to take care of me, organising excellent exhibitions and discovering my older work. I myself am also returning more and more to the work from the 80s and the key year for that period is 1986. I worked for a gallery in Los Angeles and had friends there who guided me through that difficult period. I rented a studio in New York and there was a kind of breakthrough painting where all my worlds came together. It is called 'La doctrine'. There are blue stripes on it, reminiscent of a prison: for the first time, I referred to the concentration camp past of my parents in a painting. But those blue stripes could just as well refer to the art of Daniel Buren. The iron in the painting is not only ironing history flat, it is also the instrument of the doctrinaires of conceptual art who ironed flat out everything in art at that time. There is still a third element: on the canvas is also a portrait of the Russian Avant-Garde artist Tatlin, a man who had great difficulties with Stalinism. I have an intense and preferential love for the Russian Avant-Garde, I adore Mayakovsky. Already at 16, I had his complete works, published in de GDR by Volk und Welt, and I tried to translate a play by him." HUMO: After 'La doctrine', the story of your family kept arising in your work. Is it possible to summarise? Vanriet: "I am the result of the combination of two prisoners in the camp at Mauthausen. To say it with Harry Mulisch: I am here thanks to Hitler. My father was in the Communist resistance movement against the Germans. In the camp, he managed to survive, amongst other things, because he played the violin in the camp orchestra - also once for Himmler, there on a visit. The favourite piece of music of the camp commander was 'Leichte Kavallerie' by Franz von Suppé. My mother came from a family of barge skippers, people who were just simply against the Germans, and thereby given away and deported to Mauthausen. By pure chance, my father, who had to bring bread to the women's camp, met her there - he heard her talk in the Antwerp dialect. 'Should we ever get out of here', they promised each other, 'then we'll try to find each other.' Maybe it might have been better, had they not done so. They had their camp past in common, but that was too small a basis for a successful marriage. Their relationship knew many ups and downs, at the end mostly downs. Jewish friends of mine, with dozens of deaths in the family, did not talk about their wartime past: 'We leave it behind us.' With my parents, it was just the opposite: the past was the engine of their existence. They went to all kinds of meetings of former prisoners, I was raised with this kind of thing. My first reaction was that I didn't want this oppressiveness to appear in my work; and under the influence of Pop Art, I wanted it to be light-footed. Only after the death of my father in 1989, did I start to very explicitly examine that past in my work. Before that I ever had the feeling that he was watching over my shoulder: my painting could never be as strong as what he himself had experienced." HUMO: 'A son of sorrow' you call yourself in one of your poems. But it was your wife, Simone Lenaerts, who set down the family history in a novel, 'The irreplaceable'. You didn't feel like doing this yourself? Vanriet: "I do not have the ability for the long haul, like Simone has, to do a thing like that. I am more of the little sprint and write poems; she can go for the marathon." HUMO: Your father was a socialist alderman in Hoboken. You had a red childhood. Vanriet: "I didn't oppose it. Together with my father, I was part of the weekly 'Links' (Left), with Willy Calewaert and others. I wrote TV reviews. Severe pieces - it then was fashionable to write very admonitory, with much sarcasm. Then I switched to the editorial board of the political magazine 'De Nieuwe Maand' (The New Month), with colleagues as Jean-Luc Dehaene, Karel Van Miert, Miet Smet and Wilfried Martens. Probably I'm the only editor who didn't become a minister (laughs)." HUMO: A political career would have been possible? Vanriet: "My father had a path laid out for me: first the legal profession, and then by way of the party, to parliament. I did disappoint him. For a long time, I doubted and I have been locally politically active in Hoboken for a while. But I soon realised that it was not in my character. There was an incident where it was publicly made clear to me: 'Chappie, THIS is how we do things here!' Bang! Nothing left of Jan Vanriet. But you see where the Socialists are at today. They did it to themselves. The problems to find political personnel with some talent and a certain level of thought started there and then in Hoboken (laughs)." HUMO: Am I to find it not that obvious that you were infected by the artistic microbe in that environment? Vanriet: "I started to paint around the age of 9 and nobody ever stopped me: I always got my tubes of paint. My father worked as a clerk in a shipping agency. He was a reader, he had the first books by Hugo Claus and raved about Marnix Gijsen, whom he invited home for a lecture, as he did with Boon and Geeraerts. It isn't that strange that I started to paint." BUSINESS IN THE MILLIONS HUMO: Let's talk about the comeback kid. The exhibition 'Closing Time' was very important: in 2010 you could hang your work alongside that of the biggest names from the collection of the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp. You mentioned that it was as if you could play some football with Ronaldinho. Vanriet: "Yes, 'Closing Time' was a point of reference. The Antwerp buzz was: 'This is the pinnacle of hubris, hang your own paintings next to Van Eyck, 10 centimetres away from a Memling! It'll be our pleasure to see him smash into the wall!' Sweaty hands indeed, but only one moment of real anxiety. That was when we really started to hang the paintings and a splendid oil sketch by Rubens was brought in, followed by a Modigliani. I could touch them, I practically had my nose on top of them. Ten minutes later it was over and routine set in: 'Place that Vanriet there, next to the Titian, some more space!' (laughs) Looking back at art history is essential for me. That's also why I work so much in series: viewed from the tradition you can think of all sorts of alternatives to treat a particular theme." HUMO: Do you have an idea of your position on the playing field of living artists? Stefan Hertmans once wrote: 'Somewhere between Raveel and Tuymans'. Vanriet: "That sort of positioning is awkward. What Stefan wrote is quite correct I think." HUMO: But you don't fetch Tuymans' prices yet. Vanriet: "No. But do you see an unhappy man in front of you? I don't paint to fetch record prices. I just want to see what I can still do better. That's also the interesting thing about my career, which differs from a classical evolution: often, when an artist has reached his peak, he starts to repeat his formula. That's kind of the end in fact - to put it mildly: it won't get any better any more. While I still surprise people, and myself in the first place. The peak has not yet been reached, I think. I am painting for an exhibition in London next year and now already know that it will be work no one has ever seen by me." HUMO: Meanwhile it won't have escaped your notice that a Rothko was sold for 81million dollars. Vanriet: "That's another planet and I am not on it. I don't know if I should use the word immoral for that kind of trade, in any case: I don't get it. That world of speculation isn't mine. Many people buy my work out of love, because it affects them, because they want to live with it. That's also why they sometimes refuse to lend it for exhibitions. I cherish that kind of involvement more than a record amount of money from someone who sees me only as an investment. Even if it's just paint on a canvas, it's always about venting ideas - even if Hugo Claus claimed at one point that painters are the dumbest people on earth..." HUMO: Not a speck of jealousy when a Giacometti gets sold for many millions? Vanriet: "I don't see why. I'm very pleased with what I make and with the response. And I easily bear the thought that others also get something. I regularly propose work by others to the gallery. Am I to be afraid of other painters? If they are better, they are better: life is that simple." HUMO: Do you know living painters who are better than you? Vanriet: "No (laughs). But then you don't put that question to Ronaldo either. Will he say that Messi is better?" HUMO: What is the price of a Vanriet today? Vanriet (hesitating) "It depends on the sizes. Oil paintings now go between 20.000 and 100.000 euros." HUMO: Nothing there for the modest purse? Vanriet: "The watercolours, these carry different prices: from 4.000 euros onwards." HUMO: Why the big difference? Vanriet: "It's partly tradition, but you can't quite compare watercolour and oil painting, I think. Watercolour brings about much more direct, impulsive work. An oil painting takes a much, much longer time, it is very physical work. At Polo's in Brussels, we hung a canvas of 5.5 by 2 meters: when you work on something that size, you move so much it's almost like dancing." HUMO: Are there any paintings which you don't want to separate from? Vanriet: "That turns out better than expected. But as a family we have established a list of works which we won't sell anymore, because of their historic or emotional value. That little painting over there of Remco Campert holding an eulogy next to the coffin of Hugo Claus is so emotional for me that I won't let it go anymore. Meeting Hugo Claus was fundamental for me: he already was God when I was in high school. It was an absolute miracle when later on that God also turned out to exist in real life." HUMO: What kind of work do you buy yourself? Vanriet: "For a while my love for the Russian Avant-Garde obliged me to collect a lot of printed material, first editions of Lissitzky or Mayakovsky. For the rest I have an eclectic taste: it can be abstract work from the 50s, it can be contemporary. Recently we did sell a lot, including a few highlights of our collection, such as a watercolour by Warhol. For I wanted a new studio." HUMO: The old one was worn out? Vanriet: "No, I wanted a more practical studio, where I also could store my older work under better conditions, and I have been fortunate to find something around the corner from here." HUMO: You abandon France as a place to work. Your second home there has been sold. Vanriet: "We only were there for a couple of months over the past two years; the importance of that second home had already been reduced. In summertime, you are seduced by outdoor living, but I noticed that in the other seasons, Provence left me culturally somewhat hungry. The offer is substandard compared to what you can get in the triangle Antwerp-Ghent-Brussels. There you are happy with a second rate performance of 'La Traviata', and that's it for the next six weeks. And then there is the culinary debacle. What is understood in France by good cuisine is really embarrassing. You've got one tourist trap next to the other and they're full of pretensions as well. And to say that I grew up with a great love for French culture. The discovery of the French chanson! I learned French by listening to French radio stations from the age of 17-18 onwards. For example, the programs of Coluche. I also had myself totally immersed in the spirit of Charlie Hebdo. I knew a few of those guys - Reiser, also the murdered Wolinski: I still have some drawings by them in my drawings attic. In a rash moment, 35 years ago, I even once said: 'I am not a Flemish painter, but a French one!' Because at that time, I was crazy about the airiness of Matisse and Dufy. I set myself against the Flemish soul, rooted in mud and clods. But other loves can impose themselves. In recent years, I have developed a great passion for Germany, something that would have been difficult in my family before... Now we travel a lot there, I discover the German cultural cities. And Die Zeit is a fantastic magazine, both in content AND form." LOOKING FOR X HUMO: For you the 'G' stands for Goethe, I understood from an intriguing alphabet you drew a number of years ago and which was recently published in your book 'Het dienstbare beeld' (The instrumental image). It summarizes just about your cultural world. Vanriet: "In this alphabet are the people that have defined me. And Goethe is one of them: I admire him because he is such a man of all seasons, a man who wants to touch on everything, a man who travels a lot, who writes about his travels, who also painted incredibly beautiful watercolours." HUMO: Your alphabet contains more writers than painters. Vanriet: "This here is a house of literature! The world of the visual arts is less close to my heart than the one of literature. It is also among the writers that I have my friends, with the exception of the painter Karel Dierickx." HUMO: Strange to find Xerxes between them. Vanriet: "I needed an 'X' (laughs). And the film 'Alexander the Great' with Richard Burton made an incredible impression on me. That world of the Persians! And that incredible scene in which the king is slain. In a vast plain only his carriage is left, with curtains fluttering in the wind..." HUMO: Only one film director figures in your alphabet, Fellini. However, Marc Didden once wrote that your film knowledge is extraordinary. He even suspected that you always wanted to make a movie. Vanriet: "Surely not. The one thing I've always wanted to do is paint, and mess around a bit with texts. I do regret however that I don't play an instrument." HUMO: Your musical heroes are apparently Dylan, Sinatra and Zappa. Vanriet: "Sinatra most of all. Frankie - his style, his class, his timing - is high on my list." HUMO: Also remarkable in 'Het dienstbare beeld' (The instrumental image) is your ability to make outstanding portraits. There is a very well resembling portrait of Herman Van Rompuy in it. Is resemblance important to you in a portrait? Vanriet: "It surely is, otherwise it is nonsense. First you have to have the resemblance, afterwards you can still deviate in one manner or another. The Van Rompuy portrait was for the newspaper: you don't want the reader to suspect it is the coach of Club Brugge whom he is looking at." HUMO: Is there then some suspense, waiting to see if a portrait is going to work? Vanriet: "No, I am able to do it, I don't have to prove anything anymore. However, it does require mental preparation. I am now charging myself to paint a double portrait. I worry every moment of the day about how I will handle it." HUMO: Do you avoid the self-portrait? In your many recent catalogues I don't see many. Vanriet: "Well, do come and have a look in my studio. My latest work is a self-portrait, nearly 2 x 2 meter. Self-portraits are rather fun. You can exaggerate what you see a little." HUMO: And what do you see in the mirror? Vanriet: "Time leaving its traces. Self-portraits again are a manner to link up with tradition: you think of the self-portraits of the ageing Rembrandt." HUMO: You are also scrutinising yourself in a poetry collection in preparation, 'Vaderland' (Fatherland). There, we also see a constant splitting into two: 'I am another'. Also a comeback kid in poetry? Vanriet: "Certainly. For years I didn't write poetry. Recently, Boudewijn de Groot said in the newspaper: 'I only make a record when I have to say something.' I have the same attitude, and it can happen that you have nothing to say for twenty years (laughs). Another factor: I was close with so many superb poets that I didn't always dare." HUMO: What you have to tell now seems like a warning for what is coming. You read the signs on the wall. 'Omens' is the title of an exhibition currently on view at De Zwarte Panter gallery (The Black Panther gallery). Vanriet: "What is in the process of happening is nothing to be cheerful about: we are facing major societal choices and I perceive only short-sightedness, demagogy, and way too little seriousness in the political leaders. You know the origin of my melancholic vision? When I was in high school, I grew up with the idea that the third world admittedly had a huge backlog, but everything was in motion: at the most another thirty years and things would be much better. In Africa, you had great leaders like the Ghanaian Nkrumah, the Senegalese Senghor, in the Middle East you had Nasser, Beirut was a suburb of Paris. Women started to study. In short: the future looked bright. And then the mess there is now... With those boats in the Mediterranean, we see the drama coming straight at us. I have no solutions. You won't read in my poems how to provide shelter or stop the boat fugitives. Art can not save the world. But maybe art can illuminate. Lighten the spirit by offering consolation, enlighten the mind by encouraging people to think. That thought is already sufficiently pretentious." ‘Omens.Work on Paper’ until the 21st of June in De Zwarte Panter, Antwerp. ‘Song of Destiny’ until the 13th of September in the National Museum, Gdansk. Charlotte Mullins, ‘Vanriet | Vanity’, Lannoo ‘Het dienstbare beeld. Toegepast werk van Jan Vanriet’, Willem Elsschot FR Grâce à Luc Tuymans l'art figuratif est de nouveau possible. Je devrais l'inviter un de ces jours.' Jan Vanriet PEINTRE PASSIONNÉ Hier, Jan Vanriet était encore en Pologne, à Gdansk, où il inaugurait une rétrospective, demain il se rendra en France pour y vider sa maison secondaire qu'il vient de vendre. Aujourd'hui, il me montre dans son atelier anversois les tableaux auxquelles il travaille pour son exposition à Londres. 'Je ne prends pas de vacances en ce moment,' me confie le peintre-poète. Aurait-il pu imaginer qu'à 67 ans, il aurait eu tant à faire ? 'Non, il y a quelques années, je vivais encore avec l'idée que tout était là, qu'il ne me restait plus qu'à vieillir dignement, à profiter du climat du Midi, mais maintenant je sais que j'ai encore beaucoup à faire. Mark Schaevers / photos Johan Jacobs HUMO Jan Vanriet est bien lancé, voilà ce qu'on dit sur lui. Confirmez-vous ces rumeurs? Jan Vanriet : « Oui, j'ai l'impression d'être pris dans un flux, comme un athlète qui est en forme. Chez les athlètes, il s'agit par contre d'un temps bref, suivi d'une période moins intense alors que chez moi ça dure depuis quelques années et ça ne s'arrête pas encore. » HUMO Mais vous ne vous dopez pas ? Vanriet «L'attention qu'on vous prête est une forme de dopage. Je travaille maintenant depuis deux ans avec le galériste Roberto Polo à Bruxelles, qui a apporté un vrai dynamisme dans ma vie. Il est le galériste dont j'avais toujours rêvé : quand je l'appelle, il vient voir sans tarder, ce qui est très stimulant. De surcroît, il a d'excellents contacts internationaux, ce qui m'encourage aussi. » A l'inverse de ce que beaucoup pensent, établir des réseaux n'est pas mon fort. J'ai toujours eu la chance que beaucoup de choses me tombent dessus. Il y a bientôt 45 ans que j'ai commencé à collaborer avec Adriaan Raemdonck à De Zwarte Panter, tout simplement parce que nous étions étudiants dans la même année. Il avait pris la sage décision d'arrêter la peinture, car il trouvait que d'autres étaient meilleurs que lui. Dès lors il était logique que je fasse mes premiers pas chez lui. » Ensuite, il y a eu le poète Hugues C. Pernath, un ami mais par ailleurs un homme difficile. Il s'était permis de prendre contact derrière mon dos avec Jan Lens, qui tenait à l'époque la plus grande galerie de Belgique, et qui m'y a fait entrer. » HUMO Mais ce bonheur n'a pas duré. Vous avez connu des temps plus difficiles lorsque l'art conceptuel donnait le ton : ce n'était pas votre affaire. Vanriet « J'avoue que je préfère une expression artistique plus traditionnelle à un morceau de tissu fichu sur un sol en briques. C'est une question d'émotion. J'ai vite fait le tour d'une installation, que je vois plutôt comme une activité d'étalagistes. C'est peut-être mon côté prince Charles (il sourit).» Dans les années 80 et 90 il y avait une surenchère d'art conceptuel. La peinture figurative était perçue comme une activité dépassée, ça ne se faisait plus ! Il fallait s'intéresser aux nouveaux médias et développer une nouvelle approche. Il fallait surtout beaucoup expliquer, ce qui se traduisait dans d'interminables textes aux murs. Vous pouvez facilement vous imaginer que dans ce climat, j'étais juste bon pour la poubelle. Mais je suis un comebackkid !» HUMO Est-ce que vous étiez également relégué à la poubelle par Jan Hoet, le pape de l'art de l'époque ? Vanriet « Avec Hoet, je n'ai connu que des expériences négatives, ce n'est pas un secret. Je lui faisais l'effet d'un tissu rouge sur un taureau. Un jour, il se rendait chez un collectionneur où il était enchanté par tout ce qu'il voyait, jusqu'à ce qu'un nouveau Vanriet surgit. Ni d'une, ni de deux, il s'est précipité sur son imperméable et a quitté les lieux en colère. Une autre fois, il expliquait lors d'une interview pourquoi le peintre allemand Walter Dahn n'avait pas sa place à Documenta : 'Il me fait trop penser à Jan Vanriet!'» Ainsi, j'ai été relégué aux oubliettes, c'est bien le terme, par Hoet et ses acolytes, qui de-ci, de-là sont encore en poste dans des petits bureaux poussiéreux. A l'époque je me sentais imperceptiblement glisser vers une position de samizdat (en référence aux maisons d'édition clandestines dans les pays de l'ancien bloc de l'Est, qui diffusaient des ouvrages interdits par l'Etat, ndlr). Combien on admirait à l'époque ces pauvres artistes derrière le Rideau de Fer ! Mais ici c'était la même chose. L'extrémisme dirigé contre l'art figuratif était bien plus virulent chez nous que dans les pays voisins qui comptaient davantage de musées et donc davantage de possibilités d'expositions. Nous n'avions par contre que quelques musées ; nous n'en avons toujours que trois, et quelques commissaires y faisaient régner leur loi. De nombreux talents ont été étouffés dans l'œuf à l'époque.» HUMO Dois-je comprendre ceci littéralement ? Vanriet « A Gand et ses environs, certains ont mis fin à leurs jours. Voyez la fin tragique de Marc Maet et de Philippe Vandenberg (le premier s'est suicidé en 2000, le deuxième en 2009, ndlr). Cette situation était aussi liée aux réactions contradictoires des commissaires : d'abord ils mettaient quelqu'un sur un piédestal avant de le laisser tomber comme une brique. De nombreux peintres ont connu une sévère dépression.» HUMO Mais pas Jan Vanriet ? Vanriet « Il m'arrivait de broyer du noir dans mon atelier. C'était embêtant car on pouvait à peine réagir, faute de quoi on passait pour des jaloux grincheux. Je me suis donc tu et je suis resté en retrait du monde de l'art, des coteries et des entretiens complaisants lors de vernissages. Vous ne me verrez jamais lors d'une inauguration d'un musée.» HUMO Chercher un peu de réconfort auprès des collègues par contre ne saurait faire de mal ? Vanriet « Dans le monde de l'art, il n'y a pas de collègues. J'ai à peine senti ce que pouvait être une vraie solidarité entre artistes. Julian Barnes disait récemment dans De Standaard qu'il avait grandi dans l'idée naïve que les artistes devenaient des hommes meilleurs grâce au fait que l'art était au centre de leur vie. Mais il en est revenu (sourire en coin).» AMOUR NÉ AU CAMP HUMO Vous faites plutôt cavalier seul, sans jamais rallier de groupe. Vanriet « Je me demande si la constitution de groupe n'appartient pas au passé ? Autrefois, les artistes rédigeaient des manifestes.» HUMO Et aujourd'hui ils rédigent des factures ? Vanriet « Exactement – vous m'ôtez les mots de la bouche ! Certes, ces manifestes regorgeaient d'emphase et d'inepties, mais l'acte d'écriture était incontestable. Le groupe offrait aussi un sentiment d'appartenance et de protection par temps difficiles : les artistes serraient les rangs pour se sortir de la misère. Prenons par exemple le groupe Zéro, avec lequel Ivo Michiels et Jef Verheyen entretenaient des contacts. Je les ai bien connus et je sais dans quelles circonstances misérables ils séjournaient à Milan, chez qui ils pouvaient loger gratuitement. Aujourd'hui, il y a davantage d'argent et les artistes se rencontrent dans des circonstances très différentes.» HUMO Les peintres figuratifs profitent aussi du succès des arts plastiques. Vanriet « L'attitude envers l'art figuratif a complètement changé, chez nous en grande partie grâce à Luc Tuymans. Je devrais inviter Luc un de ces jours ! En ce qui me concerne, j'ai connu un moment charnière vers 2000, lorsque Lieven Storme, qui a entre-temps quitté le monde de l'art, s'était occupé de moi, avait organisé d'excellentes expositions et avait découvert mes œuvres plus anciennes.» Je m'inspire moi aussi de plus en plus de mon travail des années 80. L'année 1986 a été l'année clé. Je travaillais alors pour une galerie à Los Angeles, où j'y avais des amis qui m'ont aidé à traverser cette période difficile. Je louais un atelier à New York où j'ai réalisé une toile qui m'a permis de percer et dans laquelle tous mes mondes convergeaient. Elle s'intitule 'La doctrine'. On y voit des rayures bleues, qui rappellent une prison : c'était la première fois que je référais dans un tableau au passé des camps de concentration de mes parents. Mais ces rayures bleues peuvent aussi bien référer à l'art de Daniel Buren. Le fer à repasser ne repasse donc pas seulement les plis de l'histoire, c'est aussi l'instrument des doctrinaires de l'art conceptuel qui passaient sur l'art comme un bulldozer. » Il y a encore un troisième élément : sur la toile figure aussi un portrait de l'artiste avant-gardiste russe Tatlin, qui a connu de grandes difficultés sous le stalinisme. J'ai une vraie prédilection pour l'avant-garde russe ainsi que pour Maïakovski. A mes 16 ans, je possédais déjà son œuvre complète, éditée en Allemagne de l'Est par Volk und Welt, et j'ai essayé à l'époque de traduire une de ses pièces de théâtre.» HUMO Après 'La doctrine', l'histoire de votre famille va être un élément récurrent dans votre œuvre. Pourriez-vous la résumer ? Vanriet « Je suis l'héritier de la combinaison de deux prisonniers du camp de Mauthausen. Ou, pour le dire à la façon de Harry Mulisch (ndt: auteur néerlandais traitant souvent de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale) : je dois ma vie à Hitler. Mon père était dans la résistance communiste contre les Allemands. Au camp, il a réussi à survivre entre autres grâce au fait qu'il jouait du violon dans l'orchestre du camp – et même une fois pour Himmler, qui était en visite à ce moment-là. La pièce favorite du commandant de camp était 'Leichte Kavallerie' de Franz von Suppé.» Ma mère était issue d'une famille de bateliers, des gens qui étaient simplement contre les Allemands et qui avaient été dénoncés et ensuite déportés à Mauthausen. Le hasard a fait que mon père, qui devait apporter du pain au camp des femmes, l'avait rencontrée là-bas et l'avait entendue parler anversois. 'Si jamais on sort d'ici, on se cherchera,' s'étaient-ils promis.' Il aurait sans doute mieux valu qu'ils ne le fassent pas. Ils avaient leur passé du camp en commun, mais c'était trop peu pour assurer un mariage réussi. Leur relation a connu beaucoup de hauts et de bas, et vers la fin surtout des bas.« Chez mes amis juifs on ne parlait pas de ce passé de guerre, avec des dizaines de morts dans la famille : 'Nous laissons cela derrière nous.' Chez mes parents, c'était tout le contraire : ce passé était le moteur de leur existence. Ils se rendaient à toutes sortes de réunions d'anciens prisonniers. Voilà le climat dans lequel j'ai grandi. Ma première réaction a été que je ne voulais pas retrouver ce sentiment d'oppression dans mon œuvre, et sous l'influence du pop'art je voulais qu'elle soit empreinte de légèreté. Ce n'est qu'après la mort de mon père en 1989 que j'ai commencé à m'intéresser à mon passé de manière explicite dans mon œuvre. Auparavant j'avais toujours un peu l'impression que mon père m'observait de par-dessus mon épaule : mon tableau ne pourrait jamais être aussi fort que ce qu'il avait lui-même vécu.» HUMO Dans un de vos poèmes, vous vous désignez comme 'Un fils de chagrin'. Mais c'était votre femme, Simone Lenaerts, qui a relaté l'histoire familiale dans un roman, 'De onvervangbare'('L'irremplaçable'). Vous ne vouliez pas le faire vous-même ? Vanriet « Je n'ai pas la grande respiration de Simone pour y arriver. Je suis plutôt du style à pousser un sprint et à écrire des poèmes; mais elle c'est plutôt le marathon.» HUMO Votre père était échevin socialiste à Hoboken. Vous avez connu une jeunesse rouge. Vanriet « Je ne m'y suis pas opposé. Je collaborais aux côtés de mon père à l'hebdomadaire Links, avec entre autres Willy Calewaert. J'y écrivais des critiques de programmes télé, des articles sévères car à l'époque il fallait écrire en donnant des leçons, avec beaucoup de sarcasme. Ensuite, je suis passé à la rédaction de la revue politique De Nieuwe Maand, avec des collègues tels que Jean-Luc Dehaene, Karel Van Miert, Miet Smet et Wilfried Martens. Je suis peut-être le seul de la rédaction à ne jamais être devenu ministre (sourire).» HUMO Une carrière politique, était-ce possible ? Vanriet « Mon père avait tracé la voie à suivre : d'abord devenir avocat et ensuite devenir parlementaire grâce au parti. Je l'ai déçu. J'ai longuement hésité. Au niveau local à Hoboken, j'ai fait une brève incursion en politique, mais j'ai vite constaté que je n'avais pas le caractère à tenir. Il y a eu un incident où on m'a clairement écharpé en public : 'Mon garçon, ici ça se passe comme ça et pas autrement ! Et vlan! Il ne restait plus rien de Jan Vanriet. Mais aujourd'hui, on voit où en sont les socialistes. Ils l'ont cherché eux-mêmes. Les problèmes pour trouver du personnel avec quelque talent et niveau remontent à cette époque à Hoboken (sourire).» HUMO Puis-je me permettre de trouver peu évident d'avoir contracté le microbe artistique dans ce genre de milieu ? Vanriet « J'ai commencé à peindre vers mes 9 ans et personne ne m'a jamais freiné : je recevais toujours mes tubes de peinture. Mon père travaillait comme employé dans une agence maritime. Il lisait, avait les premiers livres de Hugo Claus et était un fervent lecteur de Marnix Gijsen, qu'il invitait à l'occasion aussi chez lui pour un exposé, tout comme Boon et Geeraerts. Rien d'étonnant donc à ce que je commence à peindre.» BUSINESS EN MILLIONS HUMO Mais revenons au comebackkid. En 2010, l'exposition 'Closing Time' était une étape importante : vous pouviez accrocher votre propre oeuvre à côté des plus grands noms du Musée des Beaux-Arts d'Anvers. C'était comme si vous pouviez jouer une partie de football avec Ronaldinho, comme vous le formuliez. Vanriet «'Closing Time' était en effet une référence. A Anvers, on disait : « c'est bien le comble de l'orgueil : accrocher ses propres tableaux à côté de ceux de Van Eyck ou à 10 centimètres d'un Memling ! On se frottera les mains de le voir se casser la gueule ! » Et en effet, j'avais alors les mains moites, mais je n'ai tout de même eu qu'un seul moment d'angoisse. C'était lorsqu'on a commencé à accrocher les tableaux et qu'on faisait entrer une magnifique esquisse à l'huile de Rubens, suivie d'une oeuvre de Modigliani. Je pouvais les toucher, je les avais là sous le nez. Dix minutes plus tard, c'était passé et je retrouvais presque une routine : 'Donnez à ce Vanriet-là, à côté du Titien, un peu plus d'espace !' (sourire) "Pour moi, le regard vers le passé qu'on projette sur l'histoire de l'art est essentiel. C'est pourquoi je travaille aussi beaucoup avec des séries : à partir de la tradition, il est possible d'imaginer toutes sortes d'alternatives pour traiter un thème particulier. » HUMO Avez-vous quelqu'idée de l'endroit que vous occupez parmi les artistes vivants ? Stefan Hertmans notait 'quelque part entre Raveel et Tuymans'. Vanriet « Ce genre de positionnement est difficile, mais j'adhère à ce qu'a écrit Stefan.» HUMO Mais vos oeuvres n'atteignent pas encore les prix de Tuymans. Vanriet « Non. Mais est-ce que vous voyez devant vous un homme malheureux ? Je ne peins pas pour atteindre des sommets. Je veux simplement montrer ce que je peux encore faire mieux. C'est ce qui est intéressant dans ma carrière, qui s'écarte de l'évolution classique : souvent un artiste continue, après avoir atteint son moment de gloire, d'user sa formule jusqu'à la trame. En fait, je pense que c'est fini à ce moment-là et que ça ne s'arrangera pas, pour le dire en termes modérés. En ce qui me concerne, j'arrive toujours à surprendre les gens, et moi-même en premier lieu. Je n'ai pas encore atteint le meilleur de moi-même, du moins, c'est ce que je crois. En ce moment, je peins pour l'exposition de l'année prochaine à Londres et je sais dès maintenant que ce seront des œuvres que personne n'aura encore vues.» HUMO Vous aurez remarqué entre-temps que le monde de l'art est en plein essor : dernièrement un Rothko a été vendu pour 81 millions de dollars. Vanriet « Ça se passe sur une autre planète, ce n'est pas celle sur laquelle je me trouve. Je ne sais pas si je devrais qualifier ce genre de commerce d'immoral, mais ce qui est sûr c'est que je n'y comprends rien. Le monde de la spéculation n'est pas le mien. Beaucoup de gens achètent mon oeuvre par amour, parce qu'elle les touche, parce qu'ils veulent vivre avec. Parfois il leur arrive de ne pas vouloir la prêter pour des expositions. J'admire plus ce type d'engagement qu'un montant record de la part de quelqu'un qui n'y voit qu'un investissement. Même s'il ne s'agit que de peinture sur toile, il s'agit en fin de compte toujours de diffusion d'idées – quoi qu'en dise un Hugo Claus qui trouvait que les peintres étaient les gens les plus idiots au monde ...» ' 81 millions de dollars pour un Rothko? Je ne sais pas si je devrais qualifier ce genre de commerce d'immoral, mais ce qui est sûr c'est que je n'y comprends rien. Doctrine • 1986 Salted Meat - Vive le Sociale • 2014 HUMO Pas une once de jalousie lorsqu'un Giacometti atteint plusieurs millions à la vente? Vanriet « Je ne vois pas pourquoi. Je suis très content de ce que je réalise et de la réaction des autres. Et je supporte très bien qu'un autre reçoive aussi quelque chose. Je propose régulièrement à la galerie des œuvres d'autres que moi. Dois-je craindre les autres peintres ? S'ils sont meilleurs, ils faut l'admettre, la vie est aussi simple que ça.» HUMO Connaissez-vous des peintres vivants qui sont meilleurs que vous ? Vanriet « Non (sourit). Mais on ne pose tout de même pas la même question à Ronaldo ? Il ne va pas vous dire que Messi est meilleur n'est-ce pas ?» HUMO Combien coûte un Vanriet aujourd'hui ? Vanriet (en hésitant) « Cela dépend des formats. Les peintures à l'huile font entre 20.000 et 100.000 euros.» HUMO Rien à proposer aux portefeuilles moins garnis ? Vanriet « Des aquarelles, pour lesquelles s'appliquent d'autres prix : à partir de 4.000 euros.» HUMO D'où vient cette grande différence ? Vanriet « En partie, cela tient à la tradition, mais s'ajoute le fait selon moi qu'une aquarelle ne peut pas être comparée à une peinture à l'huile. La peinture à l'eau permet une œuvre plus directe, impulsive. A l'inverse, je travaille beaucoup plus longtemps à une peinture à l'huile, c'est un travail très physique. Chez Polo à Bruxelles, il y avait une toile de 5,5 mètres sur 2 : lorsqu'on travaille à ce genre de toile, on bouge tellement que ça ressemble à de la danse.» HUMO Y a-t-il des tableaux dont vous n'arrivez pas à prendre congé ? Vanriet « Ça peut aller. Mais avec la famille, on a dressé une liste des œuvres que nous n'allons plus vendre, en raison de leur valeur historique ou sentimentale. Ce petit tableau là-bas de Remco Campert qui tient un éloge funèbre auprès du cercueil de Hugo, est tellement chargé d'émotion que je ne veux plus m'en défaire. La rencontre avec Hugo Claus a été pour moi fondamentale : il était déjà Dieu quand j'étais à l'athénée. C'était un miracle absolu lorsque ce Dieu s'avérait exister réellement.» 'J'ai été relégué aux oubliettes par Jan Hoet et ses acolytes. Mais je suis un comebackkid' HUMO Quel type d'oeuvres achetez-vous vous-même? Vanriet « Ma prédilection pour l'avant-garde russe m'a poussé à collectionner pendant quelque temps beaucoup d'imprimés, les premières éditions de Lissitzky ou Maïakovski. Sinon, j'ai des goûts plutôt éclectiques : il peut s'agir d'œuvres abstraites du début des années 50 ou quelque chose de contemporain. Nous venons d'ailleurs de vendre beaucoup, entre autres quelques œuvres phares de notre collection, telles qu'une aquarelle de Warhol, le but étant d'acquérir un nouvel atelier.» HUMO Est-ce que l'ancien était usé ? Vanriet « Non, je voulais un atelier plus pratique, où je pourrais mieux conserver mes oeuvres plus anciennes, et j'ai eu la chance de trouver quelque chose dans le coin.» HUMO Vous dites qu'en France vous avez un lieu de travail, mais vous y avez vendu votre résidence secondaire. Vanriet « Ces deux dernières années, nous n'avons passé que quelques mois en France, donc nous ne tenions plus tellement à une résidence secondaire. En été on est par ailleurs tenté par la vie à l'extérieur, mais en dehors de la saison d'été la Provence m'a laissé sur ma faim au niveau culturel. L'offre y est très maigre en comparaison avec ce qu'on trouve dans le triangle Anvers-Gand-Bruxelles. Là-bas on se contente d'un spectacle de deuxième catégorie de 'La traviata', et voilà tout ce qui se présente pour un mois et demi. Puis il y a la débâcle culinaire : ce qui passe en France pour de la bonne cuisine est honteux. Cela ressemble plutôt à des pièges à touristes, qu'ils traitent avec beaucoup de prétention. « J'ai cependant grandi avec une grande admiration pour la culture française. La découverte de la chanson française ! J'ai appris le français en écoutant dès mes 17, 18 ans les radios françaises. Par exemple les programmes animés par Coluche. J'étais aussi complètement dans l'ambiance de Charlie Hebdo. J'ai connu quelques dessinateurs comme Reiser et Wolinski, qui a été assassiné. Je conserve quelques dessins d'eux dans mon grenier à dessin. « Il y a 35 ans, j'ai même affirmé à un moment imprudent : 'je ne suis pas un peintre flamand, mais français' parce qu'à ce moment-là j'avais une grande admiration pour la légèreté de Matisse et Dufy. Je me suis alors opposé à l'âme flamande trempant dans la boue et enracinée dans la terre. Mais d'autres amours peuvent surgir. Ces dernières années, j'ai une grande passion pour l'Allemagne, ce que ma famille aurait eu du mal à digérer autrefois... Nous y voyageons beaucoup et je découvre ainsi les villes culturelles allemandes. Je trouve aussi que Die Zeit est un très bon journal, tant pour son contenu que sa forme.» EN QUÊTE DE X HUMO J'ai compris que pour vous le 'G' renvoie à Goethe d'après l'intrigant alphabet que vous avez dessiné et qui a paru récemment dans votre livre 'Het dienstbare beeld' (L'image sur commande). Il résume en quelque sorte votre monde culturel. Vanriet « Cet alphabet reprend les personnes qui m'ont marqué. Et Goethe en fait certainement partie : je l'admire pour sa polyvalence, c'est un homme qui touche à tout, qui voyage beaucoup, qui relate ses voyages par écrit et qui a par ailleurs réalisé des aquarelles d'une grande beauté.» HUMO Votre alphabet compte plus d'écrivains que de peintres. Vanriet « Vous avez ici une maison des lettres ! Je suis moins attaché au monde des arts plastiques qu'au monde des lettres. J'ai aussi mes amis parmi les écrivains, à l'exception du peintre Karel Dierickx.» HUMO Bizarre de voir figurer Xerxès parmi le lot. Vanriet « J'avais besoin d'un 'X' (sourit). Puis le film 'Alexandre le Grand' avec Richard Burton m'avait aussi fait un effet incroyable. Le monde des Perses ! Et cette scène inoubliable où le roi est mis à mort. Dans l'immensité de la plaine on ne voit plus que son char avec des rideaux claquant au vent...» HUMO Votre alphabet ne compte également qu'un seul cinéaste, Fellini. Pourtant, Marc Didden avait noté que vos connaissances en la matière sont exceptionnelles. Vanriet « Pas vraiment. Tout ce que j'ai toujours voulu faire c'est peindre et bricoler un peu avec des textes. Ce que je regrette par contre c'est de ne pas savoir jouer d'un instrument de musique. HUMO Vos héros en musique sont apparemment Dylan, Sinatra et Zappa. Vanriet « Surtout Frank Sinatra avec son style, sa classe, son sens du timing me fait craquer.» HUMO Ce qui frappe également dans 'Het dienstbare beeld' (L'image sur commande), est que vous réalisez d'excellents portraits. Ainsi, l'ouvrage compte un portrait très ressemblant de Herman Van Rompuy. Est-ce que dans un portrait la ressemblance est importante pour vous? Vanriet « Bien sûr, sinon c'est n'importe quoi. D'abord il doit y avoir de la ressemblance et ensuite on peut s'en écarter d'une façon particulière. Ce portrait de Van Rompuy était réalisé pour un journal : vous ne voulez tout de même pas que le lecteur y reconnaisse plutôt l'entraîneur du Club de Bruges. » HUMO Est-ce que réaliser un portrait crée pour vous un certain suspens quant à savoir si le résultat sera réussi ? Vanriet « Non, je sais le faire, je n'ai plus rien à prouver. Par contre, cela demande une préparation mentale. En ce moment, je suis en train de me préparer à peindre un portrait double. Je me creuse la tête à chaque moment de la journée pour savoir comment je vais m'y prendre.» HUMO Est-ce que vous évitez l'autoportrait ? Dans de nombreux catalogues récents je n'en vois pas beaucoup. Vanriet « Je vous invite à venir jeter un coup d'oeil dans mon atelier ! C'est justement le sujet de ma dernière œuvre, qui fait près de 2 mètres sur 2. Je prends un certain plaisir à faire des autoportraits. Vous pouvez en ajouter une couche par rapport à ce que vous voyez.» HUMO Et que voyez-vous dans le miroir ? Vanriet « Que le temps laisse ses traces. Les autoportraits sont aussi une façon de s'insérer dans la tradition : on songe aux autoportraits de Rembrandt vieillissant.» HUMO Vous vous observez également dans un recueil de poèmes en préparation, 'Vaderland' (Patrie). Il y a là aussi sans cesse un dédoublement : 'Je est un autre.' Le comebackkid se manifeste-t-il aussi dans le domaine de la poésie ? Vanriet « Certainement. J'ai laissé tomber l'art de la poésie pendant des années. Boudewijn de Groot confiait dernièrement à un journal : 'Je ne fais un disque que quand j'ai quelque chose à raconter.' J'ai la même attitude, et il se peut que pendant vingt ans on n'ait rien à dire (sourit). Ce qui a également compté c'est que je fréquentais tellement de grands poètes que je manquais d'audace. HUMO Ce que vous avez à raconter maintenant me semble être un avertissement de ce qui nous attend. Vous lisez les signes au mur. 'Omens' est d'ailleurs le titre de votre exposition qui se tient à De Zwarte Panter actuellement. Vanriet « Ce qui s'annonce ne me ravit pas : nous nous trouvons devant de grands choix de société, alors que chez les politiciens je n'observe que de la politique à la petite semaine, de la démagogie et un manque de sérieux flagrant. « Savez-vous d'où viennent mes idées sombres ? Quand j'étais à l'athénée, j'ai grandi avec l'idée que le tiers monde avait un énorme retard, alors que tout était en mouvement : cela ne prendrait que trente ans au maximum avant que tout ne rentre dans l'ordre. En Afrique, il y avait de grands leaders tels que le Ghanéen Nkrumah, le Sénégalais Senghor, au Moyen-Orient il y avait Nasser et Beyrouth était une banlieue de Paris. Les femmes faisaient des études. Bref, l'avenir était radieux. Et voyons la ruine que c'est devenue... Avec ces bateaux en mer Méditerranée nous voyons débarquer le drame chez nous. Je n'ai pas de solutions. Dans mes poèmes vous ne lirez pas comment il faut accueillir ou refouler des réfugiés. L'art ne peut pas sauver le monde, mais peut-être que l'art peut apporter une légèreté et un éclairage. D'une part alléger l'esprit en apportant un peu de réconfort et d'autre part éclairer l'esprit en faisant réfléchir les gens. Cette idée seule semble déjà assez prétentieuse.» 'Omens.Work on Paper' à voir encore jusqu'au 21 juin à De Zwarte Panter, Anvers. 'Song of Destiny' encore jusqu'au 13 septembre au Musée national de Gdansk. Charlotte Mullins, 'Vanriet Vanity', Lannoo 'Het dienstbare beeld. Toegepast werk van Jan Vanriet', Willem Elsschot Genootschap

  • VANRIET VANITY | THE POWER OF PAINT, by Eric Rinckhout | DE MORGEN

    3/19/2015

    Belgium

    THE POWER OF PAINT Belgian painter Jan Vanriet is a success from Brussels to Great Britain and on to Moscow Triumph. All is well with Jan Vanriet. After an acclaimed exhibition in Moscow, he now shows work in Brussels. The British Museum has acquired watercolours by him and there are upcoming exhibitions in Warsaw and Birmingham. 'His strength is his autobiographical painting, which simultaneously tackles universal themes', says critic Charlotte Mullins. Eric Rinckhout 'Salted Meat, Vive La Sociale!' (2014), a work of no less than 2 x 5,5 meters. The career of Jan Vanriet (67) gained momentum in recent times and this is certainly also due to the dynamic approach of gallerist Roberto Polo who arrived in Brussels a few years ago and has taken on quite a few artists from the north of the country. Roberto Polo opened his gallery in the Sablon quarter of Brussels in November 2012 with an exhibition of Jan Vanriet. The great attention that the French-speaking Belgian press paid to the painter was quite striking. But there is also the quality of the work. According to the English art critic Charlotte Mullins, who recently wrote a book about the painter, the power of Vanriet lies in the fact that through his painting, he universalises the personal: "On the basis of a photograph of his dancing parents or his dying uncle, he explores his family history", she says. "At the same time, his paintings are about the destructions of war and they treat universal themes such as memory, remembrance, loss and the complexity of love." Mullins makes a comparison between Vanriet's paintings about the war experiences of his family – mother, father and uncle were held in the concentration camps – and the portrait of 'Uncle Rudi' ('Onkel Rudi', 1965) by the famous German painter Gerhard Richter. Richter, according to Mullins, like Luc Tuymans, is primarily interested in images and their different functioning in the media and in painting. "By comparison, Jan Vanriet fully enjoys the possibilities of painting, the pleasure and the power of paint", she says. She sees Vanriet's wide variety of styles and the widely divergent manners in which he explores a theme, as the strength of his oeuvre. Instrumental work Until March 1st, Jan Vanriet showed forty portraits of Holocaust victims at the Jewish Museum in Moscow. This exhibition, held exactly 70 years after the liberation of the Nazi camps by the Russian army, received both massive attention from the Moscow media and attracted a large number of visitors. In those works, some of which were also shown at the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen towards the end 2013 under the title 'Losing Face', Vanriet restores a murdered people to "a second life". "Now they are present again", he says about them. With this series, he clearly touched a raw nerve. The Russian organizer of the exhibition in Moscow said that Vanriet "shows the horror without shocking". Author Stefan Hertmans wrote that with Vanriet "the often tragic content" coincides with "the enormous vitality, inventiveness, sensuality and a painter's pleasure": "the memento mori is a triumph of art". In 2017, the exhibition will travel to the brand new and impressive Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw. Five of the Holocaust portraits – watercolour paintings - were acquired recently by the Curator of the Modern Collection, Department of Prints and Drawings, of the renowned British Museum in London. To this collection – one of the world's best and most important, including works by Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Rubens and Rembrandt – also works on paper by Jan Fabre and Luc Tuymans have been added recently. "These acquisitions are part of a broader vision of The British Museum to strengthen the collection in the area of modern and contemporary prints and drawings from Belgium and The Netherlands", says An Van Camp, Curator of Flemish and Dutch drawings, as well as prints. Van Camp calls Fabre, Tuymans and Vanriet "leading contemporary artists". But there is more. From May 15th onwards, Jan Vanriet will show in 'Song of Destiny' in the National Museum of Poland in Gdansk, an overview of some fifty paintings from the period 1986-2014. Followed early next year, under the title 'The Music Boy', by an exhibition of paintings and watercolours at The New Art Gallery Walsall near Birmingham. Just recently, Vanriet also published a survey of his commissioned works between 1972 and now: 'The Instrumental Image'. All his life, the painter has enjoyed working "in the service of", as he calls it. Inter alia he worked for 'Behoud de Begeerte' ('Keep Desire Intact'), the literary magazine 'Revolver', the 'Willem Elsschot Society' and the newspaper 'De Morgen', for which, Vanriet has for a number of years, from 2000 onwards, regularly provided drawings and watercolors, both for the news pages and for the Saturday supplement 'Zeno'. Vanriet calls his commissioned work "a relic of my journalistic period." In the 1960s, he was Editor of the magazine 'Links' ('Left'), co-founded by his father, and written interviews for the weekly magazine 'Panorama' – then a totally different magazine than today. David Hockney Notwithstanding all his international success, Jan Vanriet doesn't lose sight of his homeland. He recently bought a new, spacious studio in Antwerp, the city where he will, this coming May, show his latest watercolours at De Zwarte Panter gallery. This is the gallery where he first exhibited in 1973, following his studies at the Antwerp academy. In those days, things also went quite fast forward. As a young artist, Jan Vanriet soon joined renowned galleries, such as Lens Fine Art in Antwerp and, in the 1980s, Isy Brachot in Brussels and Paris. At that time, he made colourful, playful work, inspired by the painter David Hockney, but a sharp use of line in the tradition of Picasso and Ingres were his trademark. He was invited to important biennials: São Paulo in 1979 and Venice in 1984. In Venice he exhibited with Jan Fabre, José Vermeersch and Karel Dierickx. 1986 was a year of key importance. Vanriet painted 'Portrait of an Uncle'. Not a portrait in the strict sense, but a canvas on which he painted an accordion, his uncle's favorite instrument, as if it were the crematorium of the concentration camp of Dachau, which his uncle barely survived. Shortly after World War II, his uncle, his mother's twin brother, died of exhaustion. It is as if Vanriet only realised in 1986, at 38, to what extent and how long his family history had already been under his skin and that the horrors of war could no longer be ignored by him. Furthermore, this was period in which painting was no longer taken seriously. The resistance to it in circles of conceptual and minimal art gave Vanriet the strength to continue and to start making his strongest work. From then on his work contains several distinct threads that remain nevertheless closely interwoven: war, oppression of the vulnerable individual, domination of ideological systems as Nazism and Communism, and the twisted relationship between artist and politics. Vanriet's opposition to it is made of a generous humanism. Vanity Vanriet's many voices are evident once more in the exhibition now running in Brussels. Vanriet explores the theme in all its meanings, shapes and sizes. The artist prefers to work in series: "I need a guideline, a theme, however cryptic it may be." Roberto Polo's exhibition space in Brussels has almost doubled in size and Jan Vanriet seizes the opportunity to install an almost museum scale exhibition. It starts with a bang. Meat EVERY day: monumental Irish six ribs, very tangibly painted, take over the first space. This is how the artist explores the ancient vanitas theme: the way of all flesh. Vanitas paintings of the 16th and 17th century mainly showed the brevity of life and its earthly pleasures, with symbols like a clock, a skull and a candle on the verge of extinguishing. Vanriet does it by means of corruptible flesh and withered flowers. Temporality manifests itself in different ways. For instance, Vanriet paints his parents, based on an old photograph. But their image disintegrates, their faces blur, just as happens with memories. Only the monumentally-painted bracelet of his mother is an imperishable object, no doubt raising many personal memories. There also are paintings with light effects, shadows, silhouettes, puddles and drops. Vanriet strives to capture in paint all that is ephemeral and barely tangible. 'Vanity' means, not least, 'to be vain': portraits are featured and viewed in museums, where the works of painters – who are also vain – hang on the walls. With this excellent and overwhelming exhibition, Vanriet demonstrates that he can express himself in all genres: portrait, still life and cityscapes, figuration and near abstraction. As a spectator, one can only agree with Stefan Hertmans' verdict: Jan Vanriet's oeuvre "deserves its place in between Raveel and Tuymans, as the impressive testimony of a great and passionate painter." 'Vanity', until April 19th VANRIET DEMONSTRATES THAT HE CAN EXPRESS HIMSELF IN ALL GENRES, PORTRAIT, STILL LIFE AND CITYSCAPES, FIGURATION AND NEAR ABSTRACTION. The monumental 'Big Bracelet' (2 x 2,6 m, 2014), based on a jewel of Vanriet's mother. 'The Visitor, MuZee' (2013). Jan Vanriet painted his wife on visits to several museums. Also on view in the exhibition at the Brussels Roberto Polo Gallery. 'Moszek' from the series of Holocaust portraits, recently exhibited with great success in Moscow. This watercolour is one of five recently acquired by The British Museum.

  • Jan Vanriet, Storyteller, by Muriel de Crayencour | MuCity

    3/19/2015

    Belgium

    ENGLISH Born in 1948, Antwerp artist Jan Vanriet was the star of the show at the opening of the Roberto Polo gallery in November 2012. This is his second exhibition in this gallery. The gallery has almost doubled in area since then, following the addition of the neighbouring retail space. It’s a huge, spectacular three-storey venue – the perfect place to effectively display Vanriet’s large canvasses. From the entrance, we see immense paintings depicting pieces of red, bloody meat. It’s a metaphor for the socialist party, says Roberto Polo, smiling. Here, the promises (bright red meat); there, the disappointment (meat turned black). Beyond this symbolism – a bit blunt or subjective –, we relish in the way the artist enjoyed painting these very, very enlarged chunks of flesh in large strokes. The texture, colour and the gesture of the brush make us happy. Jan Vanriet loves books, poetry, language and the latter’s relationship with images. He’s a painter but also a poet. Again and again, his paintings take us on a journey into memory. From the same community of painters as Luc Tuymans, Vanriet has consistently painted in a realistic narrative style which could also be described as romantic. Vanriet is influenced by his private family history, but also by History with a capital H, which has largely impacted the life of his parents and grandparents, through the tragedy of the Holocaust. His work is most narrative when he evokes this history. For example, he painted a couple dancing cheek to cheek or a musician/soldier holding a clarinet – images based on old snapshots. The couple is a recurrent subject in several of his paintings, giving him many opportunities to work with different backgrounds and different scales. In the gallery’s basement, a large-sized painting depicts a gold bracelet with large links. For Vanriet, Big Bracelet is an opportunity to render complex materials, working with the reflection of light and, at the same time, deftly conjure up his history, since the bracelet belonged to his mother. In other works on the same theme of the bracelet, he breaks down the reflections to convert them into pure colour: bright yellow, black or an abstract grid. In some paintings like Opéra Black, Opéra Blue or his bunches of flowers, we get the feeling that the artist has indulged in the joy of creating a beautiful image. And why not? Other works, such as Emptiness 3, The Promise or Halali, Man, tend to convey intense emotions like sadness or anxiety. Then there’s also this other series, The Visitor, which depicts one or two people in a museum like the MuZee, Kunsthaus, the Yvon Lambert gallery or the WIELS Contemporary Art Centre: lost in an massive space, these individuals become artworks themselves, solemn in the middle of the other artwork exhibited.

  • VANRIET VANITY | FLANDERS TODAY

    3/9/2015

    Belgium

    The memory of a bracelet Next weekend the exhibition Losing Face by the important Antwerp contemporary painter and poet Jan Vanriet, earlier on view in Kazerne Dossin in Mechelen, will end at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow. The event reached the local press when Vladimir Putin showed up at the opening night, coinciding with the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Vanriet’s confronting yet subtle portraits, all of Jewish and Roma deportees leaving for Auschwitz from the Dossin Barracks, move ondifferent levels. They not only make real people from those who were considered numbers; they are also reminiscent of the fact that Vanriet’s very personal, almost autobiographical art is often influenced by the memory of history. His parents, uncle and grandmother were all deported because of their involvement in the Belgian resistance. His mother and father met in Mauthausen concentration camp. The moving portraits, based on mug shots from Dossin’s photographic archives, were made between 2009 and 2012. What the artist painted afterwards is now to be seen in the Roberto Polo Gallery in Brussels. The 40-odd oil paintings shown at the exhibition Vanity emphasise the wide range of his art. In the accompanying book, by British art critic Charlotte Mullins, there are more than 100 paintings chaperoned by poems, songs, sketches and watercolours, presenting a wider understanding of Vanriet’s motives. The poem he wrote last year as a companion to the painting “Bracelet” (pictured ) is especially revealing: ‘Links around her wrist / the gold carat gleam // Rudi Schuricke singing K/ omm zurück / Komm zurück // and the gypsy’s / roving violin / a lark warbling / black eyes, fiery eyes / you ruined me // Matinee at Billiard Palace: / above our heads / a gilt spider chandelier / and my mother and I / we desire nothing more / than magic and lemonade. (Translation by Ted Alkins.) Pared-down suffering Vanriet’s mother died shortly before he painted “Bracelet”. Mullins explains in the prologue of her book: “The bracelet is therefore a lodestone, an embodiment of her and Vanriet’s memories of her, its shiny golden surfaces reminiscent of the polished brass fittings in the theatre, which they frequented together when he was a young child.” Vanriet described his “Bracelet” pairings as introverted and controlled. The “Salted Meat” paintings you see when you enter the gallery are anything but. Mullins says they are a metaphor for the body, “paring down all human suffering, and yet remaining full of energy”. The biggest one refers in its bloody big-format rawness to Ensor’s grandeur and political stand. Think social struggle and meat socialism. “These are portraits from the past, but they are also portraits for today, as people are still being persecuted for what they believe and for being who they are,” said Vanriet in his opening speech in Moscow. These new oil paintings talk about the past, the present and the future. Divided into nine series, Vanriet explores what it means to be a painter, but more profoundly what it means to be human. “When painting I am busy with colour, composition and aesthetics,” he told Mullins last year. “But the story that I tell is about who I am; I cannot help it.” Vanriet | Vanity by Charlotte Mullins is published by Uitgeverij Lannoo. The exhibition at Roberto Polo Gallery runs until 19 April Antwerp artist Jan Vanriet explores what it means to be human at new exhibition

  • JAN VANRIET | 'Do Mention the War', by Sam Steverlynck | H Art

    3/5/2015

    Belgium

    Jan Vanriet exhibits with Roberto Polo in Brussels and just about everywhere around the world Do mention the war Jan Vanriet may be nearing retirement but he’s not sitting still. After conquering Moscow, he is now showing a series of new works at the Roberto Polo Gallery. It marks a stream of publication and exhibition launches both at home and abroad. Sam STEVERLYNCK These are busy times for the Antwerp artist Jan Vanriet (1948). Recently returned from Moscow, where he had an exhibition at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, he is already presenting a new series of 47 paintings with Roberto Polo. In May, he will display works on paper at De Zwarte Panter Gallery in Antwerp and two weeks later he will hold a major retrospective at the National Museum in Gdansk. There are also a number of new books: on his magazine, newspaper and publishing commissions ('Het Dienstbaar Beeld'/'The Instrumental Image'); on his watercolors; a catalogue for his show in Gdansk; and in January 2016, a new collection of poems. As if all this were not enough, in March he moves into his new studio, housed in a former printing plant in the center of Antwerp. It seems like a very busy schedule. "Well, I don't have much of a problem getting myself organized", he says in a relaxed way. But after his exhibition in Moscow, he still needs to unwind. "It was overwhelming. There was a huge interest, both in terms of numbers of visitors and from the media." The artist exhibited some 40 portraits, most of which were previously shown in the Dossin barracks in Mechelen. These were portraits which he painted from the identity photos of Jews and gypsies sent from Mechelen to Auschwitz. These moving canvases were displayed in Moscow in a brilliant installation conceived by the famous architect Sergei Tchoban - he drew his inspiration from 'Portrait of an Uncle', a key work from Vanriet’s oeuvre which recalls his accordion-playing deported uncle in an image of a concentration camp crematorium in the form of an accordion. Tchoban used the fully stretched, open, accordion form to make zigzag steps, rendering the oppression and the horror almost physically tangible. After Mechelen and Moscow, the exhibition moves on to the new Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw in 2017. "There are also negotiations for other venues", says the artist. He quickly adds: "But not only with Jewish museums. It is an exhibition that can always be mounted in a modified form. Indeed, there is a pool of work that is not only about these portraits, but is linked to the theme of the Second World War. The proportions of the available space will determine the exhibition." SERIAL ARTIST And as far as space goes, Vanriet certainly can’t complain about Roberto Polo. With the conversion of a neighbouring property, the gallery has almost doubled in size. Vanriet’s new work on show there is grouped in thematic clusters. Does he often work in series? "Yes, I am a series person. I rarely make a work that stands just on its own. I always try to think in series. Maybe it’s because I’m busy with poetry. When I make a collection, I think in cycles that relate to one other. As a painter I also try to think in cycles. When I make a first painting I also begin asking myself: could I have not interpreted it differently? What possibilities are inherent in this theme? I am not in the comfortable situation of the writer who just saves a version on his computer and invents a new variation. If I continue my thinking, I always have to make new works. It also often happens that I have the idea to paint something, but change direction while painting. The painting itself determines whether I follow another course. And then when the painting is finished, I still tend to start all over again and make the painting which I originally had in mind." He goes on. "Here we have hung six to seven series. The series are larger than what you see here. It is a very large gallery, but even here, I cannot show everything. It is with a heavy heart that we had to leave out works from each series. But that was done in function of the space." The sequences also sometimes connect with each other, improving their coherence. "The series are not isolated from one other. There is a common factor, even if it is only myself. My interests and all the things that fascinate me are all in there. So you have the series inspired by the lights that you often see in opera houses. You could link that with the series 'City Lights', which is about scenic imagery from Berlin in the 30s, where lighting was very important. In this exhibition, I deliberately introduced such work into the ‘Opera series’. Then there is 'The Visitor' series, where my wife visits all kinds of exhibitions.” THE CONTRACT The most important series however is 'The Contract'. This is not just in size, but also in terms of theme. The work illustrates how ‘Big History’ is part of Vanriet's personal biography. His parents were both known members of the resistance and met in the Mauthausen camp, which explains Vanriet's fascination with the Second World War. “'The Contract' is based on a family snapshot. In this photograph, we see my parents embracing at the time of their engagement. It all looks happy, but later on ends rather painfully. In this series, I give a vague hint that something is already amiss. The body language already betrays something.” Vanriet reused the photograph in a polyptych of 11 smaller paintings. "It definitely was not the intention that it would become a series. I was satisfied with one painting. But then I thought: what if I do this or that? I started to look for other forms of interpretation. After that series was finished, I thought: why 50 by 60 and not 1m50 by 1m10? Still later on, I made another two that are larger in size." The artist repeats the same image in different pictorial arrangements. He does this in different colours and styles. But he also plays with focus and framing. So in one of the works, you only see the couple's feet. The artist also zooms in and out. This variety within a same series also translates to the other works. Vanriet goes from a classic floral still life to paintings that are more abstract, to meter-high images of steaks. This stylistic variety is typical of his oeuvre. "I am not just one human being. Cees Nooteboom once began an essay about my work with the question: ‘How many Vanriets are there?’ There are a fair number. And here you can see that clearly, because the various spaces of the gallery have given me the opportunity to let diverse themes emerge." And then, he adds, wittily: "I find it has become a nice group exhibition." Jan Vanriet, 'Vanriet I Vanity' at the Roberto Polo Gallery until April 19. Rue Lebeau 8-12, Brussels. Open Tue-Fri 2-6 pm, Sat-Sun 11 am to 6 pm www.robertopologallery.com “I rarely make a work that stands just on its own. I always try to think in series. Maybe it’s because I'm working on poetry. When I make a collection, I think in cycles that relate to one other. “ Jan Vanriet. Photograph Jean-Pierre Stoop Salted Meat (diptych), 2014, oil on canvas, 180 x 300 cm The Contract, Puddle, 2013, oil on canvas, 150 x 110 cm

  • JAN VANRIET | LOSING FACE IN MOSCOW | LA LIBRE BELGIQUE

    2/13/2015

    Belgium

  • VANRIET VANITY | "Tous les émois de la vie en peinture" by Claude Lorent | ARTS LIBRE

    2/13/2015

    Belgium

  • JAN VANRIET | "Color of memory", by Anna Martovitskaya |WWW.ARCHI.RU

    2/9/2015

    Russia

    The installation of Jan Vanriet’s exhibition ‘Losing Face’ is designed by architects Sergei Tchoban and Agnia Sterligova. Open from January 27th at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, the exhibition is part of the ‘Man and Catastrophe’ project dedicated to the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of prisoners from the concentration camp of Auschwitz. This theme is deeply personal to Jan Vanriet, one of Belgium’s most prominent contemporary artists: many members of his family were subject to repressions. His mother, father, grandmother and uncle participated in the Resistance movement and were camp prisoners. While the young woman managed to survive, her twin brother died shortly after his release from the concentration camp: what is left about him is a few pictures and the family legend of how he loved to play the accordion when he was small. For the artist, the image of his mother’s brother merged forever with this musical instrument: one of Vanriet’s most famous paintings is ‘Portrait of an Uncle,’ which depicts an accordion instead of a man’s face. Its stretched bellows incorporate faceless barracks windows, stairs worn by thousands of feet and a chimney with thick smoke that makes you hopeless. Now this painting can be seen in Moscow; and for the designers of the exhibition—architects Sergei Tchhoban and Agnia Sterligova—this was the inspiration for the exhibition’s installation. Forty portraits—part of an ambitious series, ‘Losing Face’ created by Vanriet painting from tiny black and white mug shots of prisoners—are placed in a deep introverted space, with the internal walls painted in dark gray and the external walls covered with the names of victims who transited through the Dossin Barracks. The bulk of the names is in light gray font, while only a few are darker. The meaning of the architects’ message is clear: millions perished in the Holocaust, and little information can be found about only some of the victims. The exhibition space is designed as a trapezoid: its sides are built like an accordion with the bellows leading to the narrow butt with the ‘Portrait of an Uncle’ which makes the painting the semantic epicenter of the exhibition. However, the architects’ solution is also based on a foundation of no less importance: “The plan of the Bakhmetyevsky Garage, which houses the Jewish Museum, is based on a similar “comb” principle; and it was very important for our project to pay tribute to the architectural works by Konstantin Melnikov,” Sergey Tchhoban said. “In addition, this form is a perfect tool for enhancing the perspective, and an incredibly interesting technique for exhibiting paintings,” the architect says. “When entering the exhibition, the visitor is first involuntarily completely intrigued by the central painting, while the faces on the sides are seen only partially, ‘in passing.’ However, as the visitor moves along the walls, the portraits gradually show up, and when you find yourself inside of the installation, all of these people are looking at you and telling you their tragic history.” The exhibition designers also found the optimal height of walls: the four-meter fence visually completely isolates you from the exhibition space of the museum, repeatedly reinforcing the effect of becoming immersed in Vanriet’s story. The final and, perhaps, the most emotionally devastating chord is the two children’s portraits, which are placed by the architects at the rear end of the hall. These are much larger canvases (1x2 meters, whereas all the portraits of adults are 40x50 cm), literally dominating the exhibition. While all adult prisoners are mostly pictured as “the head on a white background,” the two boys are shown in full. One of them, Hermann, who is at most five years old, is a well-dressed boy, alone in a photographic studio, on a chair, with a toy. Only the absence of adults around him (and the painting unmistakably lets you understand that they were there originally) can sow a touch of anxiety in this idyllic picture. The second boy is his contemporary Samuel, and his portrait is also based on everyday life; but it shows a small concentration camp prisoner. The difference between the two children is caught by the visitor at a glance, and this glance is an abyss that separates life from life on the verge of death. The ‘Losing Face’ exhibition will run until March 1, 2015. Text: Anna Martovitskaya

  • JAN VANRIET | LOSING FACE IN MOSCOW | AFISHA

    2/7/2015

    Russia

    The most important lifestyle Russian magazine, AFISHA, has selected the exhibition Jan Vanriet I Losing Face, until March 1st at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, as one of the best five exhibitions to see in Moscow, along with the Piero Della Francesca retrospective in Pushkin Museum.

  • Jan Vanriet | The tragedy of illustrations “Man and Catastrophe” in the Jewish Museum, by Elena Kravtsoun | KOMMERSANT

    1/30/2015

    Russia

    EN
 30 January, Friday 

 Kommersant
 The tragedy of illustrations “Man and Catastrophe” in the Jewish Museum 
 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Sergey Kiselev, Kommersant 

 The project “Man and Catastrophe” has opened in the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, timed for the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the prisoners from Auschwitz concentration camp. It includes three exhibitions: "Losing Face" by the Belgian artist Jan Vanriet, the series "Signs" by the Russian photographer Egor Zaika, and also the exhibition "Architecture of Death: drawings of Auschwitz-Birkenau". ELENA KRAVTSUN tells us.
 
 Visitors are met by the Russian photographer Egor Zaika’s exhibition "Signs". Photographs, dazzling in their sunlit appearance and rich colouring hang on both walls of a narrow corridor. They are distinguished from the photographs which the dandyish Egor takes in great quantities for glossy magazines only by their load of meaning. The harmless-looking little houses with toy-like tiled roofs, the quiet valleys and piercing sky have a terrifying history. The names of these places are synonyms not only of the Second World War but also of the most terrible tragedy in the history of mankind. Zaika has been photographing views of the surroundings of Oswiecim, Dachau, Treblinka, Sobibor and other death camps as they are today for three years and still cannot stop, it is such a vast theme. The local pastoral landscapes with blossoming trees, reminiscent of touching watercolours, begin to be associated with these sea anemones — beautiful alluring predators which bring destruction, if you are close to them. 

It was precisely in these surroundings that there were buildings that looked like ordinary factory buildings, designed to the slightest details by German architects for lethal purposes. The architecture of murder on 15 pages of architectural documentation, drawn up pedantically and accurately, the lack of emotion of which makes one feel uneasy, was made available for the exhibition in Moscow by the archives of the Israeli memorial complex "Yad Vashem". The drawings of Auschwitz-Birkenau were found in Berlin a few years ago, and then came into the public domain. From the rectangular huts, the designs for the watchtower, gas chambers, crematorium and gates in the form of an arch made of yellowing sheets with the signature of Heinrich Himmler, which is what the double Latin letters "HH" stand for, you can re-create in detail the appearance of Auschwitz. 

 An industry of death was technically created and grew, set up as a production line. The disgust felt at each new detail is, nevertheless, mixed with a spell cast by the catastrophe. It is in this way that someone may look at an approaching tsunami, no longer able to resist inexorable fate. The cruel statistics of victims, which are given here, next to the drawings, are, in actual fact, not something you are really aware of and they remain, however horrifying, just a figure, until your eyes meet the faces of the people who might have lived. 

 Before depersonalising the future prisoners of the death camps and forcibly depriving them of their individuality, the town’s Immigration Police photographed them for the documents. From these black and white archive photographs, the Belgian Jan Vanriet, guided by his intuition, began to draw portraits, in which he engaged in glorifying vibrant unattainability and pure colours. His forty pictures under the name "Losing Face" show his Flemish heritage, thinking in series and in small forms. However, despite the good intentions of giving eternity in oils on canvas to the heroes of the photographs, who died in the camps, Vanriet’s pictures, one after another, breathe a deadly poison of melancholy, and not in the last place due to the monotonous manner. Here, it would seem, there are physically attractive women, whose names are given as Miriam or Jeanne, painted posing dramatically, but you do not have the strength to remember them or, even more so, to hold them in your heart. The portrait of Abraham is perceived as a collective image of a philosophical Jew in round-lens spectacles with a poetic diagnosis in his glance, and there is no small number of people like this in Vanriet’s series, and only the image of Sarah disputes everything around her with her hedonistic, flirty smile, transforming her thanks to her beauty from a victim to the mistress of the situation. At some time all these faces become so familiar that they merge into a single commemorative and archetypal Kaddish. 

 Jan Vanriet: I gave new life to these people through my portraits. On the international day of remembrance of the victims of the Holocaust, the Belgian artist JAN VANRIET’s exhibition "Losing Face" opened in the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center. The artist presented the exhibition himself and answered ELENA KRAVTSUN’s questions. FR
 Vendredi 30 janvier

 Kommersant Tragédie en images 
Inauguration du projet « L'Homme et la catastrophe » au Musée juif de Moscou. 
 Photo : Sergey Kiselev, Kommersant 

L'Histoire sur tableau 
Le Musée juif et Centre de tolérance de Moscou vient d'inaugurer le projet « L'Homme et la catastrophe », un hommage à l'occasion du 70e anniversaire de la libération d'Auschwitz. Trois expositions font parties de ce projet : "Losing Face" du peintre belge Jan Vanriet, la série "Signes" du photographe russe Egor Zaïka, ainsi que l'exposition Architecture de la mort : les plans d'Auschwitz-Birkenau. Un récit d'Elena Kravtsoun. 

 Tout d'abord, le visiteur est accueilli par l'exposition "Signes", du photographe russe Egor Zaïka. Les deux parois du corridor étroit affichent des photographies qui éblouissent par leur luminosité et leurs couleurs. Des clichés que le dandy couche abondamment sur pellicule pour leur côté lustré, il n'en extrait que le sens profond. Des maisonnettes inoffensives chapeautées de petits toits de tuiles, des vallées paisibles et un ciel strident qui contient une histoire bien sombre. Le nom de ces lieux évoquent désormais non seulement de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, mais sont synonymes de la pire tragédie dans l'histoire de l'humanité. Durant trois années, Egor Zaïka a photographié ce qu'il reste de l'horreur à Auschwitz, Dachau, Treblinka, Sobibor et autres camps de la mort, et il ne peut s’arrêter : le sujet est vaste. Des paysages locaux pastoraux illustrant des arbres en fleurs, tels une aquarelle touchante, son associés avec des anémones de mer, de beaux et attirants prédateurs, porteurs de mort, dès que l’on s’approche un peu.
 
 C'est dans un tel décor que l'on découvre des bâtiments d'usine ordinaires, conçus dans les moindres détails par des architectes allemands à des fins meurtrières. L'architecture de la mort en 15 pages de documentation technique, rédigées avec soin et précision, et dont le manque d'émotion vous met mal à l'aise, a été prêtée à l'exposition par les archives du mémorial israélien de Yad Vashem. Les plans d'Auschwitz-Birkenau ont été trouvés il y a quelques années à Berlin, puis rendus publics. D'après les casernes rectangulaires, des projets de tour de guet, de chambres à gaz, de crématorium et de portes en arc de cercle couchés sur des feuilles jaunies signées Heinrich Himmler, abrégé « HH », vous pouvez recréer l'apparence d'Auschwitz en détail, pour vous rendre compte que l’industrie de la mort a été créée et a grandi, prenant une ampleur industrielle. Le dégoût, qui vous écœure à chaque nouveau détail, n'en est pas moins mêlé à une forme de fatalité. Quand l'homme regarde le tsunami s'approcher du rivage, il n'est déjà plus en mesure de résister à l'inexorabilité fatale. Le nombre atroce de victimes, visible à côté des plans, ne parvient pas tout à fait à nous rendre compte de l'ampleur de la catastrophe, il n’en est pas moins terrible, mais cela reste des chiffres. Tant que l’on ne croise pas le regard de ceux qui auraient pu vivre... 

Eux, ces futurs prisonniers des camps de la mort que la police d'immigration photographiera pour leurs registres, avant de les dépersonnaliser et de les priver de leur individualité. Jan Vanriet a parcouru ces photos d'archive en noir et blanc, guidé par son intuition, et s'est mis à peindre des portraits chantant l'inaccessibilité ambiante et les couleurs claires. Ses quarante tableaux composant "Losing Face" révèle la génétique flamande de l’artiste, pensant en gris et en petites formes. Alors que Vanriet se veut sincèrement offrir l'éternité à coup de peinture à l'huile aux héros de ces photographies qui ont péri dans les camps nazis, ses portraits qui défilent les uns après les autres ont un goût de profonde mélancolie, principalement en raison de la monotonie de l’approche. Ainsi, on peut voir des femmes physiquement attirantes, identifiées comme Myriam ou Jeanne, dessinées de manière spectaculaire avec une jolie pose, mais sans avoir la force de s’en souvenir et encore moins de les porter en son cœur. Le portrait d'Abraham est considéré comme une image collective du philosophe juif qui porte des lunettes rondes encerclant toute la poésie de son regard. Des images comme celles-ci, il y en a beaucoup chez Vanriet, et seul le portrait de Sarah contredit les autres, par son hédonisme, son sourire coquin, et sa beauté qui la transforme de victime en conquérante. À un certain moment, tous ces visages deviennent si familiers qu’ils fusionnent en un kaddish récité par des milliers de voix à l’unisson. NL 
Vrijdag 30 januari

 De tragiek van illustraties
"Mens en Ramp" in het Joods Museum 

 Expositie van de geschiedenis 
In het Joods Museum en het Centrum voor Tolerantie is het project “Mens en Ramp” geopend ter gelegenheid van de 70ste gedenkdag van de bevrijding van het concentratiekamp Auschwitz. Het project bestaat uit drie exposities: “Gezichtsverlies” van de Belgische schilder Jan Vanriet, de serie “Tekens” van de Russische fotograaf Yegor Zaika en de expositie “Architectuur van de dood: bouwtekeningen van Auschwitz-Birkenau”. Aan het woord is ELENA KRAVTSUN. 

 De bezoekers worden verwelkomd door de expositie “Tekens” van de Russische fotograaf Yegor Zaika.
Beide wanden van de smalle gang zijn behangen met foto’s die de bezoeker verblinden door felle en rijke kleurschakeringen. Van de zovele foto’s die de dappere Yegor heeft geschoten vanwege de sprankelende plaatjes, onderscheiden ze zich slechts door hun beladen betekenis. Achter die onschuldige huisjes met hun pannendakjes, stille valleien en helderblauwe hemel gaat een afschuwelijk verhaal schuil. De plaatsnamen zijn niet alleen synoniemen geworden voor de Tweede Wereldoorlog, maar ook voor de meest afschrikwekkende tragedies in de geschiedenis van de mensheid. Zaika maakt al drie jaar foto’s van het huidige panorama rond Auschwitz, Dachau, Treblinka, Sobibor en andere kampen des doods en kan er nog steeds geen genoeg van krijgen, het thema is akelig uitgebreid. De plaatselijke pastorale landschappen met bomen in bloei, waarvan je een vertederende aquarel zou kunnen maken, ga je associëren met zeeanemonen: prachtige lokkende roofdieren die zodra je in hun onmiddellijke nabijheid verkeert, dood en verderf brengen. 
Juist in deze entourage werden de op het oog gewone fabrieksgebouwen door de Duitse architecten tot in het kleinste detail ontworpen voor hun dodelijke doeleinden. De architectuur van de moorden in 15 vellen technische documentatie voor de expositie in Moskou, zorgvuldig en nauwkeurig samengesteld met een onverbiddelijkheid die ongemakkelijk aanvoelt, werd verstrekt door het archief van het Israëlisch herdenkingsinstituut Yad Vashem. De bouwtekeningen van Auschwitz-Birkenau zijn een paar jaar geleden ontdekt in Berlijn en zijn vervolgens publiek domein geworden. Aan de hand van de rechthoekige barakken, de wachttorens, gaskamers, crematoria en de boogvormige poort op de door Heinrich Himmler ondertekende vellen, althans zo wordt de combinatie van de Latijnse letters HH gelezen, kan het aanzicht van Auschwitz tot in detail worden gereconstrueerd en kan worden nagegaan hoe het productiebedrijf van de dood vakkundig werd gebouwd en uitgebreid en werd geïndustrialiseerd voor productie. De walging die zich met ieder nieuw detail verder opdringt, wordt toch vermengd met de fascinatie voor de ramp. Net zoals je bij het kijken naar een naderende tsunami geen weerstand meer kunt bieden aan het niets ontziende onheil. De choquerende aantallen slachtoffers vlak naast de tekeningen kun je toch niet volledig bevatten en blijven, hoewel verschrikkelijk, een getal, zolang je niet oog in oog hebt gestaan met hen die in leven hadden kunnen blijven. 

 Zij die naar de vernietigingskampen werden gedeporteerd, werden voordat zij werden gedepersonaliseerd en met geweld werden beroofd van hun individualiteit, door de stedelijke vreemdelingenpolitie gefotografeerd voor hun dossier. Naar aanleiding van die zwart-wit foto’s uit het archief is de Belg Jan Vanriet intuïtief portretten gaan schilderen, waarmee hij het steeds terugkerende gemis en de zuivere kleuren vertolkt. 

 In zijn veertig schilderijen getiteld “Gezichtsverlies” manifesteert hij zich als een genetische Vlaming die denkt in series en kleine vormen. Ondanks zijn goede bedoelingen om de in de kampen gestorven personages op de foto’s te vereeuwigen in olieverf op doek, maken zijn schilderijen één voor één wel een dodelijk verlangen los, niet in de laatste plaats door de eentonigheid van zijn schilderstijl. 

 Het lijkt wel of lichamelijk aantrekkelijke vrouwen, aangeduid als Miriam of Janna, dramatisch en theatraal zijn neergezet, maar je hebt de kracht niet om ze te onthouden of ze in je hart te sluiten. Het portret van Abraham wordt gezien als het collectieve beeld van de filosoferende jood met een rond brilletje en een poëtische distinctie in zijn blik, en zo zijn er heel wat in de serie van Vanriet, en alleen de afbeelding van Sara botst met alle anderen door haar gelukzalige, flirtende glimlach, waardoor zij dankzij haar schoonheid verandert van een slachtoffer in iemand die de situatie meester is. Op enig moment worden al deze gezichten zo vertrouwd dat zij samenvloeien in één archetypisch kaddisj-monument. 

 Jan Vanriet: ik heb deze mensen door mijn portretten een nieuw leven gegeven. 
 Op de Internationale Herdenkingsdag voor de Holocaust is in het Joods Museum en Centrum voor Tolerantie in Moskou de expositie “Gezichtsverlies” geopend van de Belgische schilder JAN VANRIET.
 De schilder heeft de expositie persoonlijk getoond aan ELENA KRAVTSUN en heeft haar vragen beantwoord. 

Krant "Kommersant" №15 van 30.01.2015, pag. 11

  • Jan Vanriet | En Bref, by Claude Lorent | La Libre

    1/29/2015

    Belgium

  • "Jan Vanriet shows the horror without shocking", by Eric Rinckout | De Morgen

    1/29/2015

    Belgium

    FR « Jan Vanriet expose l’horreur sans choquer » Moscou impressionnée par les portraits de l’Holocauste du peintre belge au Musée juif. ERIC RINCKHOUT A MOSCOU Jan Vanriet face aux portraits qu’il réalisa de ceux qui n’ont pas survécu à l’Holocauste. « Je leur rends un visage.” Exactement soixante-dix ans après la libération des camps nazis, le peintre belge Jan Vanriet expose quarante tableaux évoquant l’Holocauste au Musée juif de Moscou. « L’exposition traite de persécutions et de terreur, autrefois et de nos jours ». « Aujourd’hui encore, des hommes sont persécutés pour ce qu’ils pensent et ce qu’ils sont. J’espère que ce message sera compris. Par Poutine aussi. La presse russe dans son ensemble s’intéresse à l’exposition « Losing Face » de Jan Vanriet (66) au Musée juif de Moscou. Entre-temps le président Poutine lui-même a rendu visite à l’exposition. Jan Vanriet expose quarante tableaux principalement d’hommes, de femmes et d’enfants juifs qui, au cours de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale, furent déportés de la Kaserne Dossin de Malines vers le camp d’extermination d’Auschwitz-Birkenau. Entre 1942 et 1944, au total 25’484 Juifs et 252 Tsiganes sont partis de Malines. Sur la base de photos récupérées, Vanriet rend à ces victimes un nom et un visage : ainsi il rompt l’anonymat et annule la Vernichtung que les nazis ont cherché à atteindre. Sujet tabou Vladimir Ostroverkhov, qui fut à l’initiative de l’exposition à Moscou, avait vu les portraits de l’Holocauste de Vanriet à Malines et en était resté fortement impressionné. « J’étais convaincu qu’il fallait exposer ces œuvres à Moscou. Le Musée juif est l’endroit idéal pour cela. Il reste à Moscou une communauté juive très importante (600.000 sur une population de 11,5 millions d’habitants) et la problématique de l’Holocauste y est toujours vivante ». « Dans bien des familles juives parler de l’Holocauste était impossible » réagit Vanriet. « On voulait tout simplement recommencer une nouvelle vie en taisant, voire en oubliant les drames trop douloureux. Dans ma propre famille ce n’était pas le cas. Ma mère et mon père, qui s’étaient connus dans le camp de concentration de Mauthausen, ont divulgué leur histoire et ont activement participé à des congrès internationaux. J’ai grandi avec leurs récits atroces des camps. » Ostroverkhov se félicite de l’approche de Vanriet : « L’Holocauste est une tragédie humaine. Pourtant, Jan ne montre pas des tas de cadavres, le visiteur n’est pas effrayé. Ses superbes tableaux traduisent une manière non agressive de montrer ce qui s’est passé. Les Russes sont suffisamment sensibles pour comprendre son message ». Poutine aussi a visité l’exposition de Vanriet, aux côtés de deux rabbins. Mardi soir, à l’improviste, le président Vladimir Poutin rendit visite à l’exposition de Jan Vanriet au Musée juif, sans toutefois rencontrer l’artiste. Sa visite faisait suite à la controverse née en Russie à l’occasion de la commémoration du soixante-dixième anniversaire de la libération des camps de concentration. Poutine n’avait pas été invité à la cérémonie qui avait eu lieu à Auschwitz (Pologne). De plus, le ministre des Affaires étrangères polonais, Grzegorz Schetyna, avait déclaré la semaine précédente que ce n’étaient pas les Russes mais bien les Ukrainiens qui avaient libéré Auschwitz. Une remarque nullement innocente à la lumière des relations actuelles particulièrement tendues entre la Russie et l’Ukraine. Entre-temps The Moscow Times annonça que le camp fut libéré par un bataillon de l’Armée rouge, sous le commandement du major soviétique Shapiro, un Juif ukrainien, à l’époque citoyen soviétique. Au lieu d’Auschwitz, le président Poutine rendit visite au Musée juif de Moscou, où il déclara : « Il y a toujours des tentatives pour diviser l’humanité sur des bases ethniques, raciales ou religieuses. » Et il alluma des bougies à la mémoire des victimes de l’Holocauste. Avec les portraits, Jan Vanriet souhaite « donner une seconde vie » aux personnes assassinées : « Je leur donne une nouvelle identité, de sorte qu’elles soient à nouveau présentes. Le titre ‘Losing Face’ concerne aussi l’ensemble de l’humanité qui, avec de semblables cruautés, lui fait perdre la face » déclare le peintre. « Cette exposition traite de la cruauté et de la terreur au cours de la Deuxième guerre mondiale, mais aussi de nos jours. Aujourd’hui encore des hommes sont persécutés pour ce qu’ils pensent et ce qu’ils sont. J’espère que le message sera entendu, y compris par le président Poutine. Mais je suis plutôt pessimiste. On ne tire jamais les leçons de l’histoire. » Le soixante-dixième anniversaire de la libération des camps et la controverse qu’il déclencha ont suscité un vif intérêt dans la presse russe pour l’artiste Jan Vanriet et son exposition, allant des journaux comme Isvestia, Kommersant, The Moscow Times et The Art Newspaper Russia, jusqu’aux chaînes de télévision et des sites d’info comme TV Russia, MIR et Smyrna. « Je suis complètement subjugué. Je ne savais pas à quoi m’attendre » nous livre l’artiste. Assez d’œuvres choquantes Pourtant Vladimir Ostroverkhov estime qu’il y a plus. « Il y a à Moscou un très vif intérêt pour l’art contemporain et, plus particulièrement, pour l’art en provenance de l’Europe occidentale. On y trouve de grands collectionneurs qui disposent d’importants capitaux. Jan Vanriet est un nom nouveau, qui suscite indéniablement une grande curiosité. En outre, bien des amateurs d’art en ont assez de l’art choquant, ostentatoire. L’art de Jan Vanriet choque lui aussi, mais en douceur et avec délicatesse ». De plus, l’exposition a lieu au Musée juif, un musée ultramoderne, qui a ouvert ses portes en 2012, qui est très populaire, stimulant et qui propose toutes sortes de nouveautés en matière d’interactivité. Il raconte l’histoire de deux cents ans de vie juive en Russie, et les pogroms n’y sont nullement occultés. Le musée est abrité dans un ancien dépôt de bus datant de 1927, conçu par les architectes modernistes Melnikov et Shukov. Pendant quelque temps, le bâtiment a fait office de centre d’art contemporain, « The Garage », pour le pétromilliardaire Roman Abramovitsj, propriétaire entre autres du club de foot Chelsea . Il fit restaurer le bâtiment il y a quelques années. La scénographie de l’exposition de Vanriet est entre les mains de l’architecte russe Sergei Tchoban, créateur de la plus haute tour de Moscou. Son concept très astucieux donne lieu à une expérience sobre mais oppressante et à un jeu subtil avec les trois cents noms sur les murs. Grâce à Vanriet, Samuel, Baruch, Abraham, Jeanne et Ida on retrouvé un visage. Pour qu’on ne les oublie jamais. L’exposition ‘Losing Face’ se tient jusqu’au 1er mars. La semaine prochaine la grande exposition ‘Vanriet I Vanity’ montre de nouvelles œuvres de Vanriet à la Roberto Polo Gallery à Bruxelles. EN "Jan Vanriet shows the horror without shocking" Moscow impressed by Holocaust portraits by the Belgian painter in the Jewish Museum ERIC RINCKHOUT IN MOSCOW 29-01-15 Jan Vanriet in front of the portraits he made of people who didn't survive the Holocaust. 'I give them back a face.' Exactly seventy years following the liberation of the Nazi camps the Belgian painter, Jan Vanriet, shows forty paintings about the Holocaust in the Jewish Museum of Moscow. "The exhibition is about persecution and terror, then and now." “People continue to be persecuted for what they think and who they are. I hope one understands this message. And Putin also.” Jan Vanriet The Russian press pays massive attention to the exhibition Losing Face of Jan Vanriet (66) in the Jewish Museum of Moscow. Meanwhile even the Russian president Putin visited the exhibition. Jan Vanriet shows forty paintings of mainly Jewish men, women and children, who during World War II were deported from the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen (Belgium) to the Nazi extermination camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. In total 25,484 Jews and 252 gypsies were put on transport from Mechelen between 1942 and 1944. On the basis of recovered photographs Vanriet gives these victims again a face and a name: thus he breaches the anonymity and undoes the annihilation the Nazi's strove for. Unmentionable Vladimir Ostroverkhov, initiator of the exhibition in Moscow, had seen the Vanriet Holocaust portraits in Mechelen and was heavily impressed. "In my opinion we had to bring these works to Moscow. The Jewish Museum is the perfect place for this. Moscow still has a very large Jewish community (600,000 on a population of 11,5 million) and the Holocaust issues are still alive." "In rather a lot of Jewish families, the Holocaust was unmentionable", reacts Jan Vanriet. "One simply wanted to start a new life and conceal and forget the painful dramas. In my family this was different. My mother and father, who met in the concentration camp of Mauthausen, disseminated their stories and actively participated in international congresses. I grew up with their horrific camp stories." Ostroverkhov praises Vanriet's approach: "The Holocaust is a human tragedy. But Jan doesn't show piles of corpses, the viewer isn't scared away. His magnificent paintings are a non-aggressive way to show what happened. The Russians are sufficiently sensitive to understand his message." Putin visited the Jewish Museum on the side of two rabbis. Also Putin looks at Vanriet Russian president Vladimir Putin quite unexpectedly visited the Jewish Museum and Jan Vanriet's exhibition Tuesday evening, without meeting the artist however. That visit was a result of the controversy that has arisen in Russia about the commemoration of 70 year liberation of the concentration camps. Putin had not been invited to the ceremony held the day before yesterday in Auschwitz (Poland). Moreover, Polish Foreign Minister, Grzegorz Schetyna, declared last week it was Ukrainians and not Russians who liberated Auschwitz. No innocent remark in light of the tense relations between Russia and Ukraine. The newspaper The Moscow Times meanwhile reported that the camp was liberated by a battalion of the Red Army, led by Soviet Major Shapiro, a Jewish Ukrainian, but then a Soviet citizen. Instead of Auschwitz president Putin visited the Jewish Museum in Moscow, where he declared that "there are again and again attempts to divide humanity on the basis of ethnic, racial and religious grounds". He lit candles to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust. With the portraits, Jan Vanriet wants to give the murdered people "a second life": "I give them a new identity, now they are present again." The title Losing Face also implies "the whole of humanity loosing its face with such atrocities", the painter says. "This exhibition is about atrocity and terror, in the Second World War and now. Still people are persecuted for what they think and who they are. I hope this message will be understood, even by president Putin. But I am rather pessimistic. No lessons are learned from history." The seventieth anniversary of the liberation of the camps and the surrounding controversy made for massive press interest in artist Jan Vanriet and his exhibition - from newspapers as Isvestia, Kommersant, The Moscow Times and The Art Newspaper Russia to TV stations and news sites as TV Russia, MIR and Smyrna. "I'm completely overwhelmed", the artist says. "I had no idea what to expect." Shocked enough But there is more to it, says Vladimir Ostroverkhov. "In Moscow there is great interest in contemporary art and certainly for art from Western Europe. We have big, wealthy collectors. Jan Vanriet is a new name, therefore the curiosity. Moreover, many art lovers are sick of shocking and overwhelming art. The art of Jan Vanriet shocks, but in a soft, beautiful way." Furthermore the exhibition takes place in the Jewish Museum, an ultramodern and wildly popular experiential museum with all manner of new interactive gadgetry that opened in 2012. It tells the story of two hundred years of Jewish life in Russia whereby the pogroms not go unmentioned. The museum is located in a former bus depot from 1927, a design by the modernist architects Melnikov and Shukov. The depot for a time served as The Garage, a centre for contemporary art of the oil billionaire Roman Abramovitsj, inter alia the owner of football club Chelsea, who restored the building in previous years. The scenography of Vanriet's exhibition is from the hand of the Russian architect Sergei Tchoban, designer of the highest tower in Moscow. His sophisticated concept ensures an austere, haunting experience and a subtle play with three hundred first names of Holocaust victims on the walls. Samuel, Baruch, Abraham, Jeanne and Ida got, thanks to Jan Vanriet, a face again. Thus they will never be forgotten. The exhibition 'Losing Face' runs until March 1st. Next week, the large exhibition Vanriet I Vanity opens with new work by Jan Vanriet at Roberto Polo Gallery in Brussels.

  • JAN VANRIET'S PORTRAITS OF AUSCHWITZ VICTIMS ON VIEW IN MOSCOW AND PUTIN SAW THAT IT WAS GOOD, by Sam Steverlynck | De Standaard

    1/29/2015

    Belgium

    FR MOSCOU EXPOSE LES PORTRAITS DES VICTIMES D’AUSCHWITZ SIGNÉS JAN VANRIET ET POUTINE VIT QUE C'ETAIT BIEN Article rédigé par SAM STEVERLYNCK Après le succès de l’exposition ‘Losing face’ à la Kazerne Dossin à Malines, l’exposition de Jan Vanriet se déplace à Moscou. Parmi les nombreux intéressés, et non des moindres, le président Vladimir Poutine. Même si Vladimir Poutine était sans doute le grand absent à la cérémonie commémorative du soixante-dixième anniversaire de la libération du camp de Auschwitz-Birkenau, il n’aurait pas voulu laisser passer l’occasion de commémorer l’événement. Dans son propre pays, il a ainsi rendu visite au Musée juif et Centre de tolérance, avec ses 8’000 m² le plus grand musée juif au monde. Le musée fut inauguré il y a deux ans dans un ancien dépôt de bus, dessiné en 1926 dans un style constructiviste par Konstantin Melnikov. Avant cela, il abritait dans ‘The Garage’, un musée privé et domaine de prédilection de l’épouse de l’oligarque Roman Abramovich qui, tout comme Poutine, a royalement investi dans le Musée juif. Hormis une exposition permanente et interactive sur l’histoire du judaïsme, s’y dérouleront des expositions temporaires. Parmi celles-ci, l’exposition ‘Losing Face’ de Jan Vanriet. Comment l’artiste est-il arrivé jusqu’à Moscou? « A l’origine, un collectionneur russe très enthousiaste à propos de mon œuvre avait partagé son enthousiasme avec quelques personnes clés dans le monde de l’art. Et à partir de là le projet a fait son chemin jusqu’à m’inviter à Moscou », raconte Vanriet à la presse, largement représentée. « Le musée répondait aussi à l’endroit idéal. Pour le soixante-dixième anniversaire de la libération d’Auschwitz on était à la recherche de quelque chose de spécial. En 2017, l’exposition s’ouvrira sous une autre configuration au Musée juif de Varsovie. » Des visages uniques La Deuxième Guerre mondiale est un sujet important dans l’œuvre de l’artiste. Ceci s’explique par des raisons autobiographiques : son père comme sa mère faisaient activement partie de la résistance, ce qui leur valut d’être internés dans le camp de concentration de Mauthausen. C’est là qu’ils ont appris à se connaître et qu’ils ont décidé de se marier après la libération, une romance impossible. C’est aussi à cela que réfère Vanriet dans la série ‘The Contract’, qui sera exposée à la Roberto Polo Gallery à Bruxelles à partir de la semaine prochaine. Dans une série de onze tableaux, l’artiste reprend à chaque fois la même photo d’archives avec ses parents faisant quelques pas de danse. ‘Losing Face’ est, quant à elle, sa série la plus étendue sur le thème de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. La série est basée sur une publication d’environ vingt mille photos de portraits de juifs et de tziganes envoyés à Auschwitz à partir de la Kazerne Dossin. A partir de celles-ci Vanriet a réalisé quelque soixante-dix tableaux et autant de dessins. Parmi ceux-ci, 36 portraits sont exposés à Moscou, qui sont à leur tour complétés par d’autres œuvres. Les portraits sont pour Vanriet une manière de rendre un visage aux victimes. L’impression de retenue que produit la série se traduit aussi dans la palette de couleurs restreintes. Certains portraits sont rendus de manière détaillée, tandis que d’autres sont restés à l’état d’esquisse. Les personnes dont il a tiré le portrait sont à chaque fois représentées de manière unique. Ce sont ainsi des individus avec chacun leur propre histoire. Certains portent des noms typiquement juifs tels que Israël, Isaak ou Abraham, d’autres s’appellent simplement Hans ou Wolfgang. « Comment avez-vous opéré votre sélection? » s’enquiert un journaliste de TV Russia 1. « Quand j’étais en train de feuilleter ces livres de photos, il m’a semblé que c’était comme si j’avais déjà rencontré certaines personnes en rue ou au café. Certaines d’entre elles me fascinaient pourtant plus que d’autres, mais j’ai surtout pensé à réaliser un bon tableau, » explique Vanriet. Accordéon L’exposition n’est cependant pas une réédition de l’exposition à Malines. Vanriet a opéré une autre sélection en fonction de la scénographie spécialement conçue par le célèbre architecte russo-allemand Sergei Tchoban, qui s’était inspiré de l’œuvre clé ‘Portrait of an Uncle’. Le tableau représente un crématoire en forme d’accordéon. La cheminée et les rails confèrent au tableau des associations lugubres avec un camp de concentration. L’œuvre réfère à l’oncle de Vanriet, un résistant et joueur d’accordéon qui a été déporté dans un camp à l’âge de dix-huit ans. Tchoban a repris la forme d’un accordéon ouvert pour sa scénographie. Les parois, dont chacune compte un seul portrait, constituent une espèce de forme en escalier qui devient de plus en plus étroit jusqu’à aboutir en un V inversé à ‘Portrait of an uncle’. L’œuvre centrale capte entièrement le regard. La scénographie particulière élève l’ensemble à ce qu’on pourrait appeler une œuvre d’art totale. C’est un monument, un îlot de calme et de réflexion, loin des foules et du chaos de Moscou. Epoustouflant ! Jan Vanriet, ‘Losing Face’, jusqu’au 1/03 au Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center Moscow. ‘Vanity’, du 6/02 au 19/04 à la Roberto Polo Gallery, Bruxelles. EN JAN VANRIET'S PORTRAITS OF AUSCHWITZ VICTIMS ON VIEW IN MOSCOW AND PUTIN SAW THAT IT WAS GOOD 29 JANUARY 2015 | SAM STEVERLYNCK Following the success of the exhibit 'Losing Face' in the Dossin Barracks in Mechelen (Belgium), the Jan Vanriet exhibition is now traveling on to Moscow. Among the many interested none other than Vladimir Putin. Jan Vanriet before his portraits in Moscow. The accordion structure of the installation has been borrowed from the central work (below). Vladimir Putin might have been the notable absentee at the commemoration ceremony of the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, he nevertheless would not miss the opportunity to commemorate the event. He did so in his own country with a visit to the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, with its 8,000 m² the largest Jewish museum in the world. The museum opened two years ago in a former bus depot, designed in 1926 in constructivist style by Konstantin Melnikov. Previously it housed in The Garage, a private museum and vocation of the wife of oligarch Roman Abramovich, who, just as Putin, generously funded the Jewish Museum. In addition to a permanent, interactive exhibition about the history of Judaism, there are also temporary exhibitions. And thus now the exhibition Losing Face by Jan Vanriet. How on earth did the artist end up in Moscow? 'A Russian collector who was very enthusiastic about my work has told it around here to people who mean something in the art world. So the plan has grown to bring me to Moscow tells Vanriet under great press interest. 'This museum turned out to be the perfect location. And for the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz something special was wanted. In 2017 the exhibition will travels in an expanded version to the Jewish Museum in Warsaw.' Unique faces The Second World War is an important subject in the artist's oeuvre. And this also has autobiographical reasons. Both his father and his mother were active in the resistance movement, which made them end up in the concentration camp of Mauthausen. They got to know each other there and married after the liberation. An impossible romance. Vanriet also refers to this in the series 'The Contract', as of next week on view in Brussels at Roberto Polo Gallery. In a polyptych of eleven paintings the artist repeatedly reuses the same archive photograph of his dancing parents. But Losing Face is his most extensive series around the Second World War. The series is based on a publication of about twenty thousand portrait photographs of Jews and gypsies who were sent to Auschwitz from the Dossin Barracks. Vanriet made seventy odd paintings and as many drawings of these. In Moscow 36 portraits are now on view, supplemented with other works. For Vanriet the portraits are a way to give back a face to the victims. The subdued atmosphere of the series also translates into a restrained color palette. Some portraits are rendered in detail, others more sketchily. The portrayed are always rendered in a unique way. They are one by one individuals with their own story. Some have typically Jewish names like Israël, Isaak or Abraham, others are called simply Hans or Wolfgang. 'How did you make the selection?' a female journalist from TV Russia 1 wants to know. 'When I leafed through those books with photographs, it almost seemed as if I had already met some people in the street or a café. Some persons are simply more fascinating to you than others. But in the first place it has to yield a good painting', says Vanriet. Accordion The exhibition however is not a remake of his exhibition in Mechelen. Vanriet made a different selection in function of the scenography especially designed by the well-known Russian-German architect Sergei Tchoban. He was inspired by the key work 'Portrait of an Uncle'. The painting shows a crematorium in the form of an accordion. By means of the chimney and the rails it calls up grisly associations with a concentration camp. The work refers to an uncle of Vanriet, a resistance fighter and accordion player who landed as 18-year old in a camp. Tchoban reused the form of an unfolded accordion for his scenography. The walls, each carrying one portrait, form a kind of ever narrowing staircase form ending in a reverse V looking onto 'Portrait on an Uncle'. The central work pulls your view in. The special scenography lifts the totality to what nearly resembles a total work of art. It becomes a monument, an island of rest and reflection, far away from the bustle of chaotic Moscow. Breathtaking! Jan Vanriet, ‘Losing Face’, till 1/03 in the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center Moscow. ‘Vanriet I Vanity’, from 6/02 to 19/04 in Roberto Polo Gallery, Brussels.

  • Jan Vanriet | 'Holocaust Exhibit Gives Faces to the Victims' by Layli Foroudi | THE MOSCOW TIMES

    1/28/2015

    Russia

    Holocaust Exhibit Gives Faces to the Victims By Layli Foroudi | Jan. 28 2015 Jan Vanriet / Jewish MuseumThe portrait of Holocaust victim in Jan Vanriet series “Losing Faces.” Visitors to the new exhibit at the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre enter through a dark corridor. Hundreds of names are written in different shades of gray on walls and seem to fade in and out of the darkness. In the exhibit itself, some names of Holocaust victims are given faces in portraits by Belgian artist Jan Vanriet. "Each painting is an individual," said Vanriet. "It is the personality that dictates the painting." The exhibit, called "Man and Catastrophe," opened Tuesday to mark Holocaust Memorial Day and the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz and brings together the portraits of Vanriet, modern landscapes of concentration camp areas by Russian photographer Yegor Zaika and blueprints and documents from Auschwitz. "Each part of the exhibit puts forward the Holocaust from a different point of view: [from the] murder, the victim and today's perspective," said curator Maria Nasimova. Jan Vanriet / Jewish Museum One part of the exhibit, called the "Architecture of Death," shows how Auschwitz was designed by the Nazis. Nasimova called it the most "most important part of the exhibition for her" as it showed how the "machine for murder" was created and how the Nazis were "humans who surrendered their morality." President Vladimir Putin was one of those to attend the exhibit opening. Vanriet's pictures are of people whose mug shots are now held in the Kazerne Dossin archive which stores documents related to the Holocaust in Belgium and northern France. "These are portraits from the past, but they are also portraits for today, as people are still persecuted for what they believe and for being who they are," said Vanriet in a speech at the opening. Many of the people depicted in the paintings, made between 2009 and 2012, are originally from Eastern Europe and Russia and Vanriet said that was important to him. "Their roots are here. It is an honor to return them to where they are from." Vanriet's series is called "Losing Face" and these paintings, said Anna Treskunova, executive director of the museum, document the loss of character, the loss of lives and the loss of the faces of these people. "It returns these faces and these people and it reminds us that they are humans," said Treskunova. Jan Vanriet / Jewish Museum The museum, as its name suggests, is in part dedicated to building bridges between all people. Similarly, the exhibit contains a universality, depicting the Holocaust as a crime concerning all of humanity. "Everyone can relate to it because it is art," Nasimova explained, "how people react to it will be different, for example a child will understand a painting differently to an adult." The brightly colored photography of Zaika show how areas connected to the Holocaust —Auschwitz, Lublin, Treblinka — look today. "Every since childhood I thought and drew about the second world war. It was part of my upbringing," he said, "As an adult, I wanted to present a current and living picture. We live in color and so this should be presented in color too." The photos show scenes which could be anywhere and Zaika writes by the photos that the "lack of a specific reminder should serve as remembrance." The everyday can be infused with impending death, he writes, as when the Nazis would play music in camps or place a banal object in a room to lull victims into a sense of security. The museum has a host of events to accompany the exhibit, including film shows and concerts with music composed by those who died in the camps. "Man and Catastrophe" runs until March 1. Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre. 11 Ulitsa Obraztsova. Metro Marina Roshcha. Tel. 495-645

  • Vanriet in Jewish Museum Moscow, by FRANK HEIRMAN | Gazet van Antwerpen

    1/28/2015

    Belgium

  • Jan Vanriet | “It may be that people will be able to learn lessons from the past”, by DARYA PALATKINA | The Art Newspaper Russia

    1/27/2015

    Russia

    EN The Art Newspaper Moscow, Russia Jan Vanriet, “It may be that people will be able to learn lessons from the past” Text: DARYA PALATKINA The project “Man and Catastrophe” has opened in the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, timed for the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the prisoners from Auschwitz concentration camp. It includes three exhibitions: "Losing Face" by the Belgian artist Jan Vanriet, the series "Signs" by the Russian photographer Egor Zaika, and also the exhibition "Architecture of Death: drawings of Auschwitz (Oswiecim)-Birkenau". Just before the opening, I talked to Jan Vanriet, the author of a series of portraits of concentration camp prisoners and the founder of Belgian narrative art, about his project, family memories and the renaissance of art based on history. The press release for your exhibition says that you are the founder of narrative art. Could you tell us what you mean by this concept? First of all, I am, of course, not an art critic and not a theoretician of art, but I can say that I have always been an artist for whom the content of a picture is important. When I was a student in the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp in the late 1960s, my teachers created abstract works, and they could not understand why, among their students, there were people who wanted to paint pictures with a story. Then I told them that I am a literary artist. It may be that I said this in a challenging way, and now I am marked with a sort of brand as a narrative artist. At that time narrative art was not considered something “high” and, in general, in the 1970s in Belgium many people declared that painting was dead because of the tsunami of conceptual art which had crashed down. Only a few people continued to work in painting and resisted this trend with the help of narrative, and I am one of the survivors. We are now observing the return of narrative art, and it is more topical than ever. How did the idea of your project “Losing face” arise? I think that the idea arose in 2008. In 2010 the Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp, which has a world famous collection of works of Rubens and many others, was closed for reconstruction (apparently it is going to open in 2018). So, they asked me to have a last exhibition, in which my works would be combined with the museum’s collection. This exhibition ended with the first works of the “Losing Face” series. They were displayed in the hall opposite enormous rooms with full-scale Rubens canvasses. In one of the two halls I put two works, each 4 m in size — “black pictures”, in which only flaming torches were depicted, referring to the Nazi marches in Germany in 1933. In the present exhibition there will also be a “black picture”, 3 m high, in which only stones are depicted. We included these pictures in the exhibition then, because I think that the works of Rubens, Jordaens and others are propaganda: they demonstrated the strength of Catholicism as compared with Protestantism. Thus I displayed the work with flaming torches and the work with stones, which refers to the Jewish tradition of placing stones on graves. This was the beginning of the “Losing Face” series Could you tell us about its concept in greater detail? Since the 1980s I have been regularly creating works connected to history, especially the Second World War. Another important theme of my pictures was that of artists’ attitudes to politics. I painted many portraits of German artists, popular singers and actors, who collaborated with the Nazis, and of those who could not work at that time, those who were sent to the concentration camps. At that time I already knew about the existence of an archive of 20,000 photographs from the cases of people who had gone through the transit camp [in Belgium], and I had the idea of making a series of their portraits — not all of them, of course! It would be impossible to do all of them, but many of those who were deported and died in the concentration camps, because in my country, as in others, the memory of these events is disappearing. Fewer and fewer people remain who know about what happened then; and there is also the fact that the Belgians themselves took part in the deportations, and these are among the main reasons why I wanted to raise this question. When one begins to paint, there exists not only the historical aspect, but also the need to express oneself in art in a consistent way, in a good sense, — that is the second level. It is on this level, also, that such questions are decided as, for example, from what side to approach the work, what to do with it and in what form. Your parents went through the camps. How has this affected your creative work, and, in particular, this project? I grew up with the knowledge of my family’s history and I have to say that I do not consider it a very good educational approach to take children to concentration camps and to films about all these atrocities. When I was a young artist, I was involved in many processes, including political ones, but I decided to leave this theme out of my creative work. I wanted my works to be lighter. This was a time in life, the 1960s, the time of the Beatles, and I particularly liked the British pop art of Peter Blake, David Hockney, Richard Hamilton — it is much lighter than its American equivalent, and, in addition, they are both very narrative. That is, I excluded all painful themes from my creative work, they were present in my personal life, but not in my art. And it was very strange when I once created a work about the oppression of artists and two days later I painted “Portrait of an Uncle”, which will also be in the exhibition. This was in the mid 1980s. And this event was the key which opened the door to my new self-expression, reflection of my family’s history and things like that. I needed to be a sufficiently mature person to make such works — I was about 40. I was helped by the fact that at that time I painted very many — really an enormous number — of portraits of Mayakovsky, which also express the artist’s attitude to society. In this series it has all come together: politics, history and my personal past. What do you think, will this project be topical for Russia at the present time, and why? There are people who think that art can change the world. I consider that is too pretentious and quite naive. I only hope that art can enlighten the world. It may be that people will be able to learn lessons from what happened, but I do not know. Sergei Tchoban was the architect of the exhibition of your works. Please tell me how the work went and what was done. I met Sergei in Antwerp and was immediately inspired by one of his suggestions, because it was not just the concept of an interior in which paintings were hanging, but an object which emphasised the idea of the series and was a work in itself. I also very much liked the reference to the picture “Portrait of an Uncle” (it shows the accordion, which my uncle, who died after the concentration camp, used to play, lying flat – it looks like a crematorium). Sergei was inspired by this form, it turned out to be an object turned inwards, from the outside of which you cannot see the paintings, but, as soon as you go inside, the portraits look at you when you move forward, and, when you turn back, they look at you again. FR The Art Newspaper Russia Jan Vanriet : « Les gens parviendront peut-être à tirer des leçons du passé. » Texte : Darya Palatkina Le Musée juif et Centre de tolérance de Moscou vient d'inaugurer le projet « L'Homme et la catastrophe », un hommage à l'occasion du 70e anniversaire de la libération d'Auschwitz. Trois expositions font parties de ce projet : ‘Losing Face’ du peintre belge Jan Vanriet, la série ‘Signes’ du photographe russe Egor Zaïka, ainsi que l'exposition ‘Architecture de la mort : les plans d'Auschwitz-Birkenau’. La vieille de l'inauguration, le mensuel The Art Newspaper Russia s'est entretenu avec Jan Vanriet, auteur d'une série de portraits de prisonniers de camps de concentration et créateur de la peinture narrative belge, au sujet de son projet, des souvenirs de sa famille et du renouveau de la peinture porteuse d'histoire. - Le dossier de presse de votre exposition vous présente comme le créateur de la peinture narrative. Pourriez-vous expliquer ce que signifie ce concept ? Avant toute chose, je dois dire que je ne suis bien évidemment ni un critique d'art ni un théoricien, mais je peux dire que j'ai toujours été un artiste qui accordait beaucoup d'importance à ce que contiennent les tableaux. Quand j'étais étudiant à l'Académie royale des beaux-arts d'Anvers, à la fin des années 1960, mes professeurs ne créaient que des œuvres abstraites et ne pouvaient comprendre pourquoi parmi les étudiants, l'un d'entre eux voulait absolument peindre des tableaux qui racontent une histoire. Alors je leur ai dit que j'étais un peintre littéraire. Peut-être l'ai-je dit de manière provocatrice, et maintenant on me colle une étiquette d'artiste narratif. À l’époque, la peinture narrative n’était pas considérée comme noble, et en général, dans les années 1970 en Belgique, nombres de personnes ont déclaré la peinture morte parce qu'elle a été frappée de plein fouet par l'art conceptuel. Seules quelques personnes ont continué à peindre et à résister à cette tendance en utilisant le récit. Et moi, je suis l'un de ces survivants. Aujourd'hui, on assiste au retour de l'art narratif, il est plus actuel que jamais. - Quand a surgi l'idée du projet « Losing Face » ? Je dirais qu'elle est apparue en 2008. En 2010, le Musée royal des beaux-arts d'Anvers, qui détient des collections de Rubens et d'autres peintres connus dans le monde entier, a fermé ses portes pour rénovation (à ce qu'il paraît, il devrait les rouvrir en 2018). Ils m'ont demandé de mettre sur pied une dernière exposition qui rejoindrait les autres œuvres du musée. Cette exposition se clôturait par les premiers portraits de la série Losing Face. Ceux-ci étaient présentés en face de murs gigantesques où étaient exposées les toiles monumentales de Rubens. Dans l'une des deux salles, j'avais exposé deux tableaux de 4 mètres chacun, des « tableaux noirs », qui représentaient uniquement des flambeaux, pour faire référence aux marches des nazis en Allemagne en 1933. Dans cette nouvelle exposition, il sera également question d'un « tableau noir », d'une hauteur de 3 mètres, qui ne représentera que des pierres. À l'époque, nous avions inclus ces peintures dans l'exposition parce que j’attribue une dimension de propagande à l'œuvre de Rubens, de Jordaens et d'autres : ils démontraient toute la puissance du catholicisme face au protestantisme. De cette manière, j'ai exposé le tableau illustrant des flambeaux, des pierres, des symboles liés à la tradition juive de placer des pierres sur les tombes. Ce fut les prémices de la série Losing Face. - Pourriez-vous nous en raconter plus sur sa conception ? À partir des années 1980, j'ai commencé à intégrer l'histoire à mon travail de manière récurrente, et principalement la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Par ailleurs, l'autre thème important qui transparaît dans mes tableaux était la relation entre artistes et politique. J'ai peint de nombreux portraits d'artistes, de chanteurs populaires et d'acteurs allemands, ceux qui ont collaboré avec les nazis, et ceux qui n'ont pas pu travailler durant cette période et ont été envoyés dans des camps de concentration. À ce moment-là je connaissais déjà l'existence de plus de 20 000 photographies d'archive représentants des hommes et des femmes qui ont transité dans un camp en Belgique, et c'est là que j'ai eu l'idée d'en faire toute une série de portraits – pas de chaque personne évidemment ! – c'était impossible, mais de nombre d'entre elles qui ont été déportées et ont perdu la vie dans des camps de concentration parce que dans mon pays, comme dans d'autres, les gens ont tendance à oublier. Il reste de moins en moins de personnes qui savent ce qu'il s'est passé avec exactitude à cette époque ; il faut dire aussi que des belges eux-mêmes ont participé aux déportations, c'est d'ailleurs l'une des principales raisons qui m'a poussé à soulever la question. Lorsque vous commencez à peindre, votre esquisse ne porte pas seulement sur l'aspect historique, mais également sur la nécessité d'une expression artistique cohérente, dans le bon sens du terme – c’est un second niveau. C'est également lors de ce même second niveau que l'on discute de questions telles que la façon d'aborder le travail, qu'en faire et sous quelle forme ? - Vos parents ont été déportés dans des camps. En quoi cet épisode a-t-il influencé votre œuvre, et en particulier sur ce projet ? J'ai grandi en connaissant l'histoire de ma famille et je dois dire que je ne trouve pas très pédagogique d'emmener des enfants voir des camps de concentration et des films relatant ces atrocités. Quand j'étais jeune et déjà artiste, je m'impliquais dans de nombreux domaines, y compris en politique, mais j'ai décidé de laisser ce thème en dehors de mon art. Je voulais que mes tableaux soient plus légers. C'était une époque animée, les années 1960, les Beatles, j'aimais particulièrement le pop-art britannique de Peter Blake, David Hockney, ou encore Richard Hamilton : beaucoup plus léger que le pop-art américain, mais quoiqu'il en soit, les deux sont très narratifs. Donc j'ai exclu tous les sujets difficiles de mon œuvre, ils étaient présents dans ma vie privée, mais pas dans mon art. Et ce fut très étrange lorsqu'un jour, j'ai dessiné un tableau sur l'oppression des artistes et deux jours plus tard, j'ai peint le Portrait d'un oncle, qui est également exposé à Moscou. C'était dans les années 1980. Cet événement a été la clé qui m’a ouvert la porte d'une nouvelle expression de soi, un reflet de l'histoire de ma famille, et ainsi de suite. Il faut être suffisamment mature pour réaliser de tels tableaux ; j'avais environ 40 ans. Ce qui m'a aidé, c'est qu'à cette époque, je peignais de très nombreux – et c’est peu de le dire – portraits de Maïakovski, qui exprimaient également les liens entre l'artiste et la société. Dans cette série, tout était réuni : la politique, l'Histoire et le passé de l’artiste. - À votre avis, à l'heure actuelle, est-ce que ce projet est opportun en Russie ? Pourquoi ? Il y a des gens qui pensent que l'art peut changer le monde. Je crois que c'est trop prétentieux et plutôt naïf. J'espère seulement que l'art puisse éclairer le monde. Les gens parviendront peut-être à tirer des leçons du passé, mais je n'en suis pas sûr. - C'est Sergueï Tchoban qui a mis en forme votre exposition. Comment s'est déroulée la collaboration ? Qu'avez-vous fait concrètement ? J'ai rencontré Sergueï à Anvers et j'ai immédiatement été séduit par l'une de ses propositions, parce qu'il ne s'agissait pas simplement d'une conception d'un intérieur où l'ont pend des tableaux, mais d'un lieu qui met en exergue la série de tableaux et s'avère véritablement une œuvre en soi. J'ai également beaucoup aimé la référence au tableau Portrait d’un uncle (il représente un accordéon déposé sur le sol qui ressemble à un crématorium, il s’agit de celui avec lequel jouait mon oncle, décédé des suites de son emprisonnement en camp de concentration). Sergueï s'est inspiré de cette forme pour créer un lieu introverti en dehors duquel il est impossible de voir les tableaux ; il faut donc prendre la peine de rentrer pour voir comment les tableaux vous regardent quand vous avancez. Et comment ils vous regardent quand vous reculez. Source : http://www.theartnewspaper.ru/posts/1202/ NL 27 Januari 2015 MOSKOU RUSLAND Jan Vanriet: “Misschien kunnen mensen lering trekken uit het verleden” DARYA PALATKINA In het Joods Museum en het Centrum voor Tolerantie is het project “Mens en Ramp” geopend ter gelegenheid van de 70ste gedenkdag van de bevrijding van het concentratiekamp Auschwitz. Het project bestaat uit drie exposities: “Gezichtsverlies” van de Belgische schilder Jan Vanriet, de serie “Tekens” van de Russische fotograaf Yegor Zaika en de expositie “Architectuur van de dood: bouwtekeningen van Auschwitz-Birkenau.” Aan de vooravond van de opening spraken wij met Jan Vanriet, de schilder van een serie portretten van concentratiekampgevangenen en de grondlegger van de Belgische narratieve schilderkunst, over zijn project, het familiegeheugen en de wedergeboorte van de verhalende schilderkunst. In het persbericht over de expositie is gezegd dat u de grondlegger bent van de narratieve schilderkunst. Zou u kunnen vertellen wat daaronder wordt verstaan? Allereerst ben ik natuurlijk geen kunstcriticus of -theoreticus, maar ik kan wel zeggen dat de inhoud van de schilderijen voor mij als schilder altijd belangrijk is geweest. Toen ik eind jaren 60 student was aan de Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerpen maakten mijn docenten abstracte werken en zij konden niet begrijpen dat er studenten waren die een kunstwerk wilden schilderen met een verhaal erachter. Toen heb ik hen gezegd dat ik literair schilder was. Mogelijk heb ik dat toen uitdagend gezegd en nu ben ik dus gelabeld als narratieve schilder. De narratieve schilderkunst werd dus destijds niet als een hoogstaande kunstvorm beschouwd, en de schilderkunst in de jaren 70 werd in België als gevolg van de niet te stuiten vloedgolf aan conceptuele kunst in principe door velen dood verklaard. Slechts een enkeling bleef zich verzetten tegen die ontwikkelingen en ging door met verhalend schilderen en ik heb mij als een van de weinigen staande weten te houden. Nu maken wij de wedergeboorte van de narratieve schilderkunst mee en die trekt meer aandacht dan ooit te voren. Hoe is het idee voor het project “Gezichtsverlies” ontstaan? Volgens mij is het idee ontstaan in 2008. In 2010 zou het Museum voor Schone Kunsten in Antwerpen dat een wereldberoemde collectie van Rubens en vele anderen in zijn bezit heeft, zijn deuren sluiten wegens een verbouwing (het zou, meen ik, pas weer opengaan in 2018). Op dat moment werd ik gevraagd om de laatste expositie te verzorgen waarin de museumcollectie zou verenigd worden met mijn werk. De expositie eindigde met mijn eerste schilderijen van de serie “Gezichtsverlies”. Zij werden geëxposeerd in de zaal tegenover de enorme ruimtes met de kolossale doeken van Rubens. In een van de twee zalen heb ik twee doeken van ieder 4 m opgehangen uit de serie “Zwart”, waarop alleen maar fakkels zijn afgebeeld die verwijzen naar de marsen van de nazi’s in Duitsland in 1933. De huidige expositie bevat ook een werk uit de serie “Zwart”, dat 3 m hoog is en waarop alleen stenen zijn afgebeeld. Wij hebben die schilderijen destijds in de expositie opgenomen, omdat ik vind dat de werken van Rubens, Jordaens en anderen propagandistische kenmerken hebben: zij zijn het toonbeeld van de kracht van het katholicisme ten opzichte van het protestantisme. Juist daarom exposeerde ik mijn schilderij met de fakkels en dat met de stenen, die verwijzen naar de joodse traditie om stenen op graven te leggen. Dat was het begin van de serie “Gezichtsverlies”. Zou u kunnen ingaan op het concept van uw werk? Sinds 1980 heb ik regelmatig werk gemaakt dat een relatie heeft met de geschiedenis, vooral met de Tweede Wereldoorlog. Een ander belangrijk thema van mijn schilderijen was de relatie kunstenaar-politiek. Ik heb veel portretten geschilderd van zowel Duitse kunstenaars, populaire zangers en acteurs die hebben samengewerkt met de nazi’s, alsook van artiesten die in die tijd werden getroffen door het Berufsverbot of die naar het concentratiekamp werden gestuurd. Toen wist ik al van het bestaan af van het archief met 20.000 foto’s uit de persoonsdossiers van de mensen die in het doorgangskamp [in België] hadden verbleven, en zo is bij mij het idee ontstaan om daarvan een serie portretten te maken, uiteraard niet van alle foto’s! Van alle foto’s zou dat niet mogelijk zijn, maar wel van een behoorlijk aantal gedeporteerden die later in de concentratiekampen zijn omgekomen, omdat de herinnering aan die gebeurtenissen net als in andere landen ook in België vervaagt. De belangrijkste redenen waarom ik deze kwestie onder de aandacht wilde brengen, zijn dat er zo langzamerhand steeds minder mensen zijn die weten wat er toen is gebeurd, en ook omdat de Belgen zelf hebben meegewerkt aan de deportaties. Als je begint te schilderen is er niet alleen de historische kant van het verhaal, maar heb je ook behoefte aan consistente artistieke expressie, in de goede zin van het woord – dit is dan in tweede instantie. In diezelfde tweede instantie valt bijvoorbeeld ook de beslissing hoe je het werk gaat aanpakken, wat je precies gaat doen en in welke vorm je het giet. Uw ouders hebben ook in het kamp gezeten. Welke invloed heeft dat gehad op uw werk, en in het bijzonder op dit project? Ik ben opgegroeid met de wetenschap wat mijn ouders is overkomen en ik moet zeggen dat ik het niet bepaald een goede pedagogische benadering vind om kinderen mee te nemen langs de concentratiekampen en naar films over al die gruwelijkheden. Als jonge kunstenaar was ik betrokken bij veel maatschappelijke en politieke ontwikkelingen, maar ik heb juist dat thema doelbewust buiten mijn werk gehouden. Ik wilde dat mijn schilderijen lichtvoetiger zouden zijn. Dat was een levensfase, de jaren 60, de tijd van de Beatles, en ik hield toen vooral van de pop-art van Peter Blake, David Hockney en Richard Hamilton die veel speelser is dan de Amerikaanse pop-art, bovendien maakten ook zij verhalend werk. Ik liet dus alle zware thematiek weg uit mijn werk: deze was alom aanwezig in mijn persoonlijke leven, maar niet in mijn kunst. En het was heel eigenaardig dat ik, toen ik op een dag een doek had gemaakt over de onderdrukking van kunstenaars, twee dagen later “Portret van Oom” schilderde, dat ook te zien zal zijn op de expositie. Dat was midden jaren 80. Dat was de sleutel voor mijn nieuwe vorm van zelfexpressie, waarin mijn familiegeschiedenis en dergelijke tot uiting zou komen. Om zulk werk te kunnen maken, moet je een zekere rijpheid hebben bereikt, ik was toen bijna 40. Wat mij destijds heeft geholpen, is dat ik in die periode een groot aantal – echt veel – portretten van Majakovski heb geschilderd, waarin ook de relatie kunstenaar-maatschappij tot uitdrukking kwam. In die serie kwam alles bij elkaar: politiek, geschiedenis en mijn eigen verleden. Wat denkt u: zal dit project op dit moment actueel zijn voor Rusland en waarom? Er zijn mensen die geloven dat je met kunst de wereld kunt veranderen. Ik denk dat dat te zeer vooringenomen en nogal naïef is. Ik kan alleen hopen dat je met kunst de wereld kunt verlichten. Misschien kunnen mensen lering trekken uit de geschiedenis, maar ik weet het niet. De expositie-architect van uw schilderijen is Sergei Tsjoban. Vertelt u eens hoe het werk is verlopen en wat er is gedaan. Ik heb Sergei in Antwerpen ontmoet en ik was direct enthousiast over één van zijn voorstellen, want dat betrof niet gewoon een concept van het interieur waar de schilderijen zouden komen te hangen, maar een object waarmee het idee van de serie zou worden geaccentueerd, dat op zichzelf al een kunstwerk is. Bovendien was ik in mijn nopjes met zijn knieval voor het schilderij “Portret van Oom” (daarop is een accordeon afgebeeld, het instrument dat werd bespeeld door mijn oom die overleed ten gevolge van het concentratiekamp, platgelegd en lijkend op een crematorium). Sergei werd geïnspireerd door deze vorm en zo is het object ontstaan. Van buitenaf zijn de schilderijen in het object niet zichtbaar, maar je hoeft maar binnen te geraken of alle portretten kijken je aan, ook als je doorloopt en je omdraait, blijven ze je volgen. 27 JANUARI 2015 • ABONNEE WORDEN (/SUBS/) AANTAL MALEN BEKEKEN: 281

  • Jan Vanriet | “Many Jews refused to discuss the Holocaust – it is too painful” | IZVESTIYA

    1/27/2015

    Russia

    EN IZVESTIYA -27 January 2015 “Many Jews refused to discuss the Holocaust – it is too painful” The Belgian artist Jan Vanriet talks about his series of paintings “Losing Face” and the unlearned lessons of the XXth century. [Photograph] Photo: Jan Vanriet On 27 January, on the International Day of Commemoration of Victims of the Holocaust, the project “Man and Catastrophe” is being presented in the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in the capital city. One of its central events will be the Belgian artist Jan Vanriet’s exhibition, “Losing Face”. Among its exhibits are 40 portraits of prisoners of the “Dossin Barracks” transit camp, painted from the motifs of real archive photographs. Jan Vanriet told “Izvestiya” about how he had chosen the heroes of his pictures from over 25,000 photographs. —When did the theme of the Holocaust first appear in your art? —The first work — “Portrait of an Uncle” — was painted in the mid 1980s. It is one of the central ones in the Moscow exhibition. My mother and uncle were twins. At the age of 16 they joined the Belgian Resistance movement against Nazism. They had just finished school, were very naïve and did not have experience of life. After they were betrayed by a Nazi who had penetrated the ranks of the Resistance, they found themselves in prison and, during the Second World War, in concentration camps. They survived, but two years after his liberation my uncle died — he had become too weak during his imprisonment. My uncle always played the accordion. In the picture dedicated to him, this musical instrument is depicted, and the outline of its bellows suggests the fence of a camp. I have many Jewish friends whose relations went through the Dossin Barracks and died in the concentration camps. The picture “Samuel”, the portrait of the uncle of one of my closest friends, will be shown in the exhibition. Among over 25,000 archive photographs which have survived, I managed to find his photograph. The work done by me motivated his heirs to study their family’s history in much greater depth: previously they, like many Jewish families, refused to discuss the theme of the Holocaust, because it was too painful. [Photograph] Jan Vanriet. Photograph. Samuel. 2013 Извести —How do you select the heroes of your portraits from the thousands of photographs which are available to you? —I am moved by an emotional, intuitive feeling. When I look at a photograph, I have the feeling that I am getting to know the person depicted in it. If there is a certain feeling of closeness, then I paint the portrait. —What meaning do you attribute to the series itself and to its name — “Losing Face”? —There is historical meaning in my work. I pay the tribute of my respect to the people who died. But the most important aim for me is to create high quality works of art. The source images are small black and white photographs, and my paintings are in colour. Each of the photographs directs me to a particular method of drawing, and dictates what colours and what types of brush-strokes to use. And I see several meanings in the name. On the one hand, I am drawing faces which have disappeared from reality. On the other — and this is the most important premise, by performing such horrific actions as during the time of the Holocaust, mankind loses face. —You grew up not far from the Dossin Barracks. Do you remember when you first went there, what emotions this visit left with you? —I knew about these barracks from my childhood, but I went there first about 10 years ago. My parents were always connected to the movement against the Holocaust, and so, from the age of seven, they took me to various concentration camps, for example to “Natzweiler” in North-East France, where my father was imprisoned during the war. So from my childhood I saw places that were more terrible than the “Dossin Barracks”, which were just a transit camp. —In your opinion, with what awareness does the young generation today perceive the events of the Holocaust? I can judge only about Belgium: there I can see growing indifference and ignorance of historic realities. The facts about what actually happened are dealt with very lightly in the media today. —What do you think, is there a risk of repetition of the Holocaust in future? —I am not sufficiently optimistic to say that the lessons of the ХХth century have been learned. [Photograph] Jan Vanriet. Photograph. Herman. 2013 [Photograph] Jan Vanriet. Photograph. Sarah B. 2013 FR Izvestia - 27 janvier 2015 « De nombreux Juifs refusaient de parler de l'Holocauste ; c'était trop douloureux. » Entretien avec le peintre belge Jan Vanriet sur sa série de peintures Losing Face et les leçons que le XXe siècle n'aura pas réussi à nous apprendre. Le 27 janvier dernier, à l'occasion de la Journée internationale de commémoration à la mémoire des victimes de l'Holocauste, le Musée juif et Centre de tolérance de Moscou a présenté le projet « L'Homme et la catastrophe ». L'un des temps forts de cet événement est l'exposition Losing Face du peintre Jan Vanriet, une série composée entre autres d'une quarantaine de portraits de prisonniers du camp de transit de la « Caserne Dossin » qu'il a peints d'après de véritables photographies d'archive. Jan Vanriet se confie au quotidien Izvestia sur la manière dont il a choisi les héros de ses tableaux parmi plus de 25’000 clichés. —Quand le thème de l'Holocauste est-il apparu dans votre œuvre ? —J'ai réalisé le tout premier tableau sur ce thème, Portret van een oom (Portrait d’un oncle), au milieu des années 1980. Il s'agit de l'une des pièces maîtresses de l'exposition moscovite. Ma mère et mon oncle étaient jumeaux. À l'âge de 16 ans, ils sont entrés dans la résistance belge. Ils venaient tout juste de finir l'école et étaient très naïfs ; ils n'avaient aucune expérience de la vie. Après avoir été dénoncés, ils ont été jetés en prison et pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, ils ont été envoyés dans des camps de concentration. Ils y ont survécu, mais mon oncle est décédé deux ans après sa libération car il avait été trop affaibli durant sa détention. Mon oncle a toujours joué de l'accordéon. Le tableau qui lui est dédié représente l'instrument de musique, dont les contours du soufflet ne sont pas sans rappeler les clôtures d'un camp de concentration. J'ai de nombreux amis juifs, dont la famille est passée par la « Caserne Dossin » et a perdu la vie dans des camps de concentration. L'exposition présentera le tableau "Samuel", le portrait d'un oncle de l'un de mes amis les plus proches. Je suis parvenu à retrouver sa photo de plus de 25’000 clichés d'archive conservés. Mon travail a permis à ses descendants de se plonger au plus profond de l'histoire de leur famille. Avant cela, à l'instar de nombreuses familles juives, ils refusaient de parler de l'Holocauste, parce que c'était trop douloureux. Jan Vanriet. Photographie : Samuel. 2013 —Comment avez-vous choisi les héros de vos tableaux parmi les milliers de photographies que vous aviez à votre disposition ? —Je fonctionne à l'émotion, au sens intuitif. Quand je regarde une photo, j'ai l'impression de connaître la personne représentée. Si je ressens une certaine affinité, j'en peins un portrait. —Quel est le sens que vous attachez à la série-même et à son intitulé, "Losing Face"? Mon travail comporte une dimension historique, je rends hommage aux morts. Mais l'objectif le plus important pour moi est de créer des œuvres d'art de très haute qualité. Alors que je suis parti de petits clichés en noir et blanc, mes tableaux sont en couleurs. Chaque image me guide vers une certaine technique de dessin, me dictant quelles couleurs utiliser et quelle épaisseur de trait appliquer. Le nom de l’exposition a plusieurs sens. D'une part, je dessine une personne qui a disparu de notre monde. Et d'autre part – et c'est le message le plus important – l'humanité, qui a commis des actes horribles, telles que durant la période de l'Holocauste, perd la face. —Vous avez grandi non loin de la « Caserne Dossin ». Vous rappelez-vous de la première fois où vous vous y êtes rendu ? Cette visite vous a-t-elle marqué ? —Je connaissais l'existence de ces casernes depuis que j’étais petit, mais je les ai vues pour la première fois l'âge de 10 ans. Mes parents avaient toujours été impliqués dans la lutte contre l'Holocauste, c'est pourquoi dès l'âge de 7 ans, ils m'ont emmené dans différents camps de concentration, comme à Natzwiller, dans le nord-est de la France, où mon père avait été emprisonné durant la guerre. Ainsi, depuis mon enfance, j'ai vu des lieux bien plus affreux que la « Caserne Dossin » qui n'était qu'un camp de transit. —D'après vous, la jeunesse d'aujourd'hui a-t-elle conscience de ce qu'il s'est passé pendant l'Holocauste ? —Je ne peux me prononcer que sur le cas de la Belgique : je remarque une indifférence croissante et une ignorance des faits historiques. Aujourd'hui, les médias peuvent très facilement brouiller la réalité. —Pensez-vous qu'un épisode tel que celui de l'Holocauste pourrait à nouveau surgir à l'avenir ? —Je ne suis pas optimiste au point de dire que nous ayons tiré des leçons du XXe siècle. Jan Vanriet. Photographie : German. 2013 Jan Vanriet. Photographie : Sara B.. 2013 NL “Veel joden wilden niet over de Holocaust praten, omdat dat te pijnlijk was” De Belgische schilder Jan Vanriet naar aanleiding van de serie schilderijen “Gezichtsverlies” en de niet geleerde lessen van de 20ste eeuw. Op 27 januari, de Internationale Herdenkingsdag voor de Holocaust, wordt in het Joods Museum en Centrum voor Tolerantie in Moskou het project “Mens en Ramp” geopend. Een van de hoogtepunten van het project wordt de expositie “Gezichtsverlies” van de Belgische schilder Jan Vanriet. Zijn expositie bestaat uit 40 portretten van gevangenen uit het doorgangskamp “Kazerne Dossin”, die zijn geschilderd naar aanleiding van authentieke foto’s uit een archief. Jan Vanriet liet de krant Izvestia weten hoe hij de personages voor zijn schilderijen uit meer dan 25.000 foto’s heeft geselecteerd. —Wanneer is het thema van de Holocaust voor het eerst in uw werk verschenen? Het eerste werk, “Portret van Oom” is halverwege de jaren 80 geschilderd. Dit portret neemt een belangrijke plaats in op de expositie in Moskou. Mijn moeder en oom waren een tweeling. Zij werden lid van de Belgische verzetsbeweging toen zij 16 waren. Ze kwamen vers uit de schoolbanken en waren heel naïef en hadden geen levenservaring. Nadat ze waren verraden door een in het verzet geïnfiltreerde nazi-aanhanger, kwamen ze in de gevangenis terecht en vervolgens in een concentratiekamp. Ze hebben het overleefd, maar mijn oom is twee jaar na de bevrijding overleden, hij was te fel verzwakt tijdens zijn gevangenschap. Mijn oom speelde altijd op zijn accordeon. Op het schilderij dat ik aan hem heb gewijd, is dat muziekinstrument afgebeeld. De blaasbalg van de accordeon doet denken aan de afrastering van het kamp. Ik heb veel joodse vrienden wier familieleden via “Kazerne Dossin” op transport zijn gegaan naar de concentratiekampen en daar zijn overleden. Een ander schilderij op de expositie is “Samuel”, het portret van de oom van een van mijn beste vrienden. Het is mij gelukt zijn foto te vinden tussen de meer dan 25.000 in dat archief bewaard gebleven foto’s. Door mijn schilderij zijn zijn erfgenamen veel dieper in hun familiegeschiedenis gedoken: vroeger wilden zij net als zovele andere joodse gezinnen niet over de Holocaust praten, omdat dat te pijnlijk was. Jan Vanriet. Foto: Samuel. 2013 — Hoe kunt u uit die duizenden foto’s die u tot uw beschikking heeft de personages voor uw portretten selecteren? — Ik word gedreven door emotie en intuïtie. Als ik naar een foto kijk, komt er bij mij een gevoel op dat ik kennis maak met de mens die daarop is afgebeeld. Als ik voel dat hij mij na staat, schilder ik zijn portret. — Welke betekenis hecht u aan de serie zelf en aan de naam “Gezichtsverlies”? — Er zit een historische betekenis in mijn werk en ik breng hulde aan overleden mensen. Maar mijn belangrijkste doel is het maken van kwalitatief hoogstaande kunst. De originele foto’s zijn klein en in zwart-wit en mijn schilderijen zijn in kleur. Ieder fotootje brengt mij tot een bepaalde schildertechniek en dicteert mij welke kleuren en penseelstreken ik moet aanbrengen. De naam is voor meerdere verklaringen vatbaar. Enerzijds schilder ik gezichten die werkelijk zijn verloren gegaan. Anderzijds – en dit is de belangrijkste boodschap – lijdt de mensheid gezichtsverlies door de gruweldaden tijdens de Holocaust. — U bent vlakbij Kazerne Dossin opgegroeid. Weet u nog wanneer u daar voor het eerst bent geweest en welke indruk dat bezoek op u maakte? — Ik wist sinds mijn kindertijd van het bestaan van die kazernes, maar ik heb ze pas een jaar of 10 geleden voor het eerst gezien. Mijn ouders waren altijd betrokken bij de Holocaust, daarom hebben zij mij vanaf mijn zevende meegenomen langs verschillende concentratiekampen zoals bijvoorbeeld Natzweiler in Noordoost-Frankrijk, waar mijn vader tijdens de oorlog gevangen had gezeten. Daarom had ik al sinds mijn jeugd plaatsen gezien die veel verschrikkelijker waren dan Kazerne Dossin, die slechts een doorgangskamp was. — Hoe bewust gaan jongeren volgens u om met de Holocaust? — Ik kan alleen oordelen over België: daar bemerk ik een groeiende onverschilligheid en onwetendheid ten aanzien van historische realia. In de media worden de werkelijk gebeurde feiten tegenwoordig heel gemakkelijk verdraaid. — Wat denkt u, bestaat het risico op een herhaling van de Holocaust in de toekomst? — Ik ben niet zo optimistisch dat ik kan zeggen dat er lering is getrokken uit de lessen van de 20ste eeuw. Jan Vanriet. Foto: Herman. 2013 Jan Vanriet. Foto: Sara B. 2013

  • Jan Vanriet | 9 ARTISTS ON POLITICS | DE MORGEN SPECIAL ISSUE

    5/24/2014

    Belgium

  • Jan Vanriet | De enige vorm van verzet, by Veerle Vanden Bosch | De Standaard

    12/13/2013

    Belgium

  • Jan Vanriet | Gezichten die moesten verdwijnen, by Eric Rinckhout | De Morgen

    11/27/2013

    Belgium

  • Jan Vanriet | Een gezicht voor de doden, by Jan Van Hove | De Standaard

    11/24/2013

    Belgium

  • JAN VANRIET | The Music Boy


    1/29/2016 - 5/8/2016


    The New Art Gallery Walsall, Gallery Square, Walsall

    United Kingdom


    The Music Boy (Black), 2013, oil on canvas, 150 x 110 cm

  • JAN VANRIET | The Music Boy


    1/29/2016 - 5/8/2016


    The New Art Gallery Walsall, Gallery Square, Walsall

    United Kingdom


    The Music Boy (Black), 2013, oil on canvas, 150 x 110 cm

  • PAINTING AFTER POSTMODERNISM BELGIUM - USA Curated by Barbara Rose


    9/15/2016 - 11/13/2016


    Vanderborght & Cinema Galeries | The Underground
    Brussels
    Belgium


    Werner Mannaers,The Lolita Series (Chapter 9), Septembre 2015, acrylic, oil, charcoal and spray paint on canvas, 200 x 180 cm For more information visit: www.pap.brussels

  • JAN VANRIET | Song of Destiny


    5/15/2015 - 9/13/2015


    National Museum, Gdansk

    Poland


    The Song of Destiny, 2012, oil on canvas, 200 x 300 cm

  • JAN VANRIET | CLOSED DOORS


    11/22/2012 - 3/10/2013


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


    Mirror Men, 2012, oil on canvas, 73 x 54 cm

  • JAN VANRIET | LOSING FACE


    1/27/2015 - 3/1/2015


    Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center, Moscow Obraztsova St., 11, build. 1A
    Moscow
    Russia


    Samuel, 2013, oil on canvas, 180 x 150 cm

  • JAN VANRIET | VANITY


    2/6/2015 - 4/19/2015


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


    Big Bracelet, 2014, oil on canvas, 200 x 260 cm

  • Recent Paintings Ceulemans, Gaube, Gilbert, Ghekiere, Mannaers, Moszowski & Vanriet


    5/19/2016 - 9/18/2016


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


    Joris Ghekiere, untitled, 2016, oil on canvas, 200 x 160 cm