Roberto Polo Gallery

The Gallery will close for Easter on Sunday, April 16th, 2017;

The Estate of Karel Dierickx

  • The Layers of Time

Artist Statement

In construction

  • KAREL DIERICKX | RAVEELMUSEUM | DE STANDAARD

    7/31/2015

    Belgium

    De Standaard Karel Dierickx retrospective in Raveelmuseum Rigourously himself For the first time, following his passing away in December 2014, a well researched overview is devoted to the work of Karel Dierickx. It is a rare opportunity to learn to know this fascinating but too little known painter at his full value.Jan Van Hove Karel Dierickx was not a man looking for the limelight. He kept far away from the changing fashions and worked quietly but with great intensity on a very personal oeuvre instead. The exhibition this summer at the Raveelmuseum makes it possible to follow his development over a period of forty years and it gives an idea about the various media he used. Karel Dierickx – Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality includes some one hundred paintings, drawings and sculptures. Because the artist regularly exhibited in Germany and France, a number of works are on view in Belgium for the first time. Karel Dierickx (1940-2014) belonged to the bustling Ghent art world. He had his studio there and from 1973 onwards he taught painting at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts of the city. This resulted in an important influence on a whole generation of artists. His students included Wim Delvoye, Jan Van Imschoot, Philippe Vandenberg, Marc Maet and many others. "Dierickx was to a large extent an artists' artist", says Piet Coessens, the curator of the retrospective in the Raveelmuseum. As a painter Dierickx started off in a figurative style. He liked traditional genres such as the landscape, portrait and still life. Evidently his work did not stop at a simple rendering of reality, but it was important to him to start from the visible world. In some of the more abstract paintings you can still feel the landscape that was at their origin. Search In the 80s, Dierickx went for a fierce, abstract style, with powerful swipes and intensified contrasts between light and dark that recall abstract expressionism. Over time he evolved towards a sensual abstraction, with paintings that look like intensely worked weavings of brush strokes and paint. Typical for this oeuvre is the persistent search for the most precise expression of the feeling that inspired the artist. The writer Stefan Hertmans described Karel Dierickx as "a melancholy soldier, a fighter for the one unbeatably right brushstroke". The Ghent artist was a master of light. As few others he could make a colour sing in an otherwise sombre, mottled background and thereby change the entire feel of a painting. From the beginning careful attention to light is also striking in his drawings, as for example in a sweet little landscape from Saint-Rémy at the exhibition. As a draftsman, Dierickx reached a spectacular high in the Stations of the Cross, exhibited in 2008 in the Landesmuseum für Kunst und Kultur in Münster. In spite of the artist being a non-believer, he portrayed the suffering of Christ with exceptional empathy and gripping dramatic power. Universal feelings of pain, powerlessness and hopelessness are called up in these expressionistic charcoal drawings. The Stations of the Cross are something special in Dierickx' oeuvre and show the artist at his best. In the 90s, the born painter he was, also started to make sculptures, mainly heads, figures and birds. In these images the artist also gropingly searches for the precise form: the plaster sculptures have the same recalcitrant quality as the paintings. And this is not by chance as Dierickx' oeuvre impresses most as a convincing and coherent body with a recognisably own formal language. It is an intimate adventure you can follow step by step. Dierickx was not unappreciated. In 1962 he won the Young Belgian Painters Award and in 1984 he took part in the Venice Biennale. He also found recognition abroad and worked for several years with a Parisian and a German gallery. Yet he never stood at the forefront. For he worked at a time when conceptual art and new media such as video, photography and installations set the tone. Dierickx was one of many artists who imperturbably continued painting at a time when the significance of painting was called into doubt. The exhibition at the Raveelmuseum shows that during that time, in the quiet of the studio, an oeuvre has grown that will remain worthwhile once the hypes and the manic prices of the day will long be forgotten. 'Karel Dierickx – 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality' in Raveelmuseum, Machelen-aan-de-Leie, until October 11th. 'Ambrosia', 1999. © Karel Dierickx 'De lagen van de tijd/Layers of Time', 2004. © Karel Dierickx 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality', 2014. © Karel Dierickx

  • KAREL DIERICKX | Karel Dierickx in the Raveelmuseum ALL EXCEPT REACTIONARY, by Isabelle de Baets | H ART

    7/16/2015

    Belgium

    H Art Karel Dierickx 
in the Raveelmuseum ALL EXCEPT REACTIONARY The Roger Raveel Museum in Machelen pays tribute to Belgian painter, Karel Dierickx, who passed away at the end of 2014. A layered solo exhibition sheds new light on his oeuvre. It shows the various forms of expression he used and the interplay between them. At the same time it makes visible the dialogue with predecessors, contemporaries and younger generations of artists. Isabelle DE BAETS The solo exhibition 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality' is not built up chronologically, but thematically and by discipline rather. Although Dierickx was in the first place a painter setting out to work from the materiality of painting, it shows that drawing and sculpture were also very important to him. The exhibition also pays much attention to the professional relations the painter cultivated with art history, with peers, with colleague teachers and students at KASK (Royal Academy of Fine Arts) in Ghent, with his friends and gallerists. From 1995 he worked closely with Hachmeister Gallery in Münster and since 2014 with Roberto Polo Gallery in Brussels. Although Dierickx' work was exhibited in the Belgian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1984 and since 1963 incorporated in various group exhibitions at home and abroad - among others in the group exhibition 'Nouvelle Subjectivité/New Subjectivity' by the famous French curator Jean Clair in Paris and in various group exhibitions by Jan Hoet - he never really made an international breakthrough. In Belgium also the interest remained limited. The reason is perhaps to be found in the fact that his work often was perceived as reactionary at a time (the 70s, 80s and 90s) when conceptual art reigned supreme and seeped into all branches of painting. This exhibition however shows that Dierickx was anything but reactionary but, on the contrary, had a very fresh way of handling classical subjects, such as landscapes, still lifes and portraits. This results in a timeless, elaborate and intimate painting, far removed from the more distant, more conceptual contemporary painting which often uses existing imagery as its starting point and merely reflects on the medium itself. WITHOUT COMPROMISE It is to Dierickx' credit that he never made compromises or adapted his way of working to the dominant tendencies of the time. He merely continued working with integrity, true to himself. His touch is expressive and varies from voluminous to sparse and minimally present. Many imposing landscapes in the exhibition show how Dierickx developed quality, especially in the rendering of impressions of landscapes. Some works have a rather dark colour palette. Light shines through dark colour tones or stripes, in other works he uses white stripes on a dark background. Examples of this are 'Omsloten situatie/Enclosed Situation' (1985), a major square canvas with white stripes on a dark background and 'Marrakech' (1985), an equally large canvas with dark stripes on a transparent, light background. The two masterpieces hang opposite each other in the exhibition. Dierickx' great examples were Morandi, Giacometti and Bonnard. Echoes of their work are ever present in his work. Even though his work is quite abstract, references to observable reality are nevertheless always present. In this, his search for plastic solutions is essential. Some sort of presence emerges from the materiality of the work without there being anything explicitly depicted. He plays a subtle game between appearance and disappearance of forms. A game the viewer's eye can continue, provided he/she takes the time to carefully take in the image. Karel Dierickx, 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality', until 11 October in the Roger Raveelmuseum, Gildestraat 2-8, Machelen-Zulte. Open Wed-Sun from 11 am to 5 pm. www.rogerraveelmuseum.be Karel Dierickx, Schier eindeloos/Almost Endless, 1995-2013, 150x150cm, oil paint, photo Dominique Provost

  • KAREL DIERICKX | Karel Dierickx in the Raveelmuseum ALL EXCEPT REACTIONARY, by Isabelle de Baets | H ART

    7/16/2015

    Belgium

    H Art Karel Dierickx 
in the Raveelmuseum ALL EXCEPT REACTIONARY The Roger Raveel Museum in Machelen pays tribute to Belgian painter, Karel Dierickx, who passed away at the end of 2014. A layered solo exhibition sheds new light on his oeuvre. It shows the various forms of expression he used and the interplay between them. At the same time it makes visible the dialogue with predecessors, contemporaries and younger generations of artists. Isabelle DE BAETS The solo exhibition 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality' is not built up chronologically, but thematically and by discipline rather. Although Dierickx was in the first place a painter setting out to work from the materiality of painting, it shows that drawing and sculpture were also very important to him. The exhibition also pays much attention to the professional relations the painter cultivated with art history, with peers, with colleague teachers and students at KASK (Royal Academy of Fine Arts) in Ghent, with his friends and gallerists. From 1995 he worked closely with Hachmeister Gallery in Münster and since 2014 with Roberto Polo Gallery in Brussels. Although Dierickx' work was exhibited in the Belgian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1984 and since 1963 incorporated in various group exhibitions at home and abroad - among others in the group exhibition 'Nouvelle Subjectivité/New Subjectivity' by the famous French curator Jean Clair in Paris and in various group exhibitions by Jan Hoet - he never really made an international breakthrough. In Belgium also the interest remained limited. The reason is perhaps to be found in the fact that his work often was perceived as reactionary at a time (the 70s, 80s and 90s) when conceptual art reigned supreme and seeped into all branches of painting. This exhibition however shows that Dierickx was anything but reactionary but, on the contrary, had a very fresh way of handling classical subjects, such as landscapes, still lifes and portraits. This results in a timeless, elaborate and intimate painting, far removed from the more distant, more conceptual contemporary painting which often uses existing imagery as its starting point and merely reflects on the medium itself. WITHOUT COMPROMISE It is to Dierickx' credit that he never made compromises or adapted his way of working to the dominant tendencies of the time. He merely continued working with integrity, true to himself. His touch is expressive and varies from voluminous to sparse and minimally present. Many imposing landscapes in the exhibition show how Dierickx developed quality, especially in the rendering of impressions of landscapes. Some works have a rather dark colour palette. Light shines through dark colour tones or stripes, in other works he uses white stripes on a dark background. Examples of this are 'Omsloten situatie/Enclosed Situation' (1985), a major square canvas with white stripes on a dark background and 'Marrakech' (1985), an equally large canvas with dark stripes on a transparent, light background. The two masterpieces hang opposite each other in the exhibition. Dierickx' great examples were Morandi, Giacometti and Bonnard. Echoes of their work are ever present in his work. Even though his work is quite abstract, references to observable reality are nevertheless always present. In this, his search for plastic solutions is essential. Some sort of presence emerges from the materiality of the work without there being anything explicitly depicted. He plays a subtle game between appearance and disappearance of forms. A game the viewer's eye can continue, provided he/she takes the time to carefully take in the image. Karel Dierickx, 'Voorstelbare werkelijkheid/Imaginable Reality', until 11 October in the Roger Raveelmuseum, Gildestraat 2-8, Machelen-Zulte. Open Wed-Sun from 11 am to 5 pm. www.rogerraveelmuseum.be Karel Dierickx, Schier eindeloos/Almost Endless, 1995-2013, 150x150cm, oil paint, photo Dominique Provost

  • Karel Dierickx | L'Aspiration au sublime pictural, by Claude Lorent | La Libre | Arts Libre

    4/11/2014

    Belgium

  • Karel Dierickx | Feast for the Eye, By Eric Rinckhout | De Morgen

    4/7/2014

    Belgium

    Traduction francaise Le peintre Karel Dierickx nous convainc avec ses paysages et ses natures mortes à la Roberto Polo Gallery Une vraie fête pour les yeux Karel Dierickx a 73 ans. Il a peint toute sa vie et pourtant, cette éminence grise de la peinture belge ne jouit, tout à fait à tort d’ailleurs, que d’une célébrité toute relative. La galerie bruxelloise Roberto Polo présente certaines œuvres du peintre, pleines de vivacité et vibrant de couleurs. Le moment pour Dierickx de se faire connaître du grand public. Eric Rinckhout Karel Dierickx Handballet Jusqu’au 18 mai à la Roberto Polo Gallery 8-10 Rue Lebeau. Bruxelles www.robertopologallery.com Karel Dierickx, né à Gand (Belgique) en 1940, appartient à une génération de peintres qui, à un moment donné, a connu un parcours semé d’embûches. Dans les années septante et quatre-vingt du 20e siècle, la peinture a traversé une période de crise. Des artistes tels Fred Bervoets, Jan Vanriet et Karel Dierickx continuaient de peindre, alors qu’un grand nombre de musées et de curateurs ne leur témoignaient plus aucun intérêt. « Nous avons été chassés dans les années septante et quatre-vingt, » atteste Jan Vanriet en 2008 dans De Morgen. « On nous faisait entendre qu’on ne correspondait pas aux nouvelles tendances en art. Quelle que soit la portée d’une telle phrase, elle a bel et bien perdu certains peintres. Si vous manquiez vous-même de ressort ou que vous ne pouviez compter sur la sympathie des collectionneurs, vous étiez fichu. » C’est à cette époque difficile que Karel Dierickx fait la connaissance du galeriste Heiner Hachmeister. Grâce à sa galerie à Münster, de nombreuses œuvres de Dierickx se trouvent dans des collections et des musées en Allemagne. Bien que Dierickx ait continué d’exposer ses œuvres en Belgique (encore récemment au Musée Raveel et à l’exposition Sint-Jan de Jan Hoet à Gand (2012)), il reste un tuyau confidentiel, mais ceci pourrait bientôt changer. Dierickx a attiré le regard du galeriste dynamique Roberto Polo, qui a entre-temps exposé les œuvres d’une série impressionnante d’artistes : des peintres tels que Jan Vanriet, Jan De Vliegher, Mil Ceulemans, Marc Maet ainsi que le photographe Bert Danckaert et des expositions avec Karin Hanssen, Michaël de Kok et Werner Mannaers sont attendues. Karel Dierickx semble avoir trouvé un nouveau souffle en Belgique : ses dessins, sculptures et peintures sur les trois niveaux que compte la galerie ne laissent pas d’impressionner. Dierickx se voit lui-même comme un peintre à l’ancienne. Il réfère indubitablement à ses motifs ‘éternels’ tels que les paysages, les marines, les natures mortes et, plus rarement, à l’autoportrait. Ce qui compte, c’est bien sûr ce qu’il fait à partir de là. Le nom de Morandi surgit parfois car Dierickx apprécie la nature morte ou encore le nom de Fautrier, car Dierickx pratique aussi l’action painting. Cependant, la comparaison s’arrête là. Le poète Roland Jooris décrit avec pertinence l’œuvre de son ami Dierickx comme une forme de ‘peinture sculptée’. Avec ses doigts, comme s’il voulait pétrir la peinture et lui conférer une troisième dimension. Ainsi, ses tableaux deviennent des sculptures hautes en couleurs et à angles multiples, qui réfléchissent la lumière. Cette approche nous conduit vers des artistes tels que Medardo Rosso, Rik Wouters et Alberto Giacometti, qui pétrissaient également leurs œuvres et créaient des tableaux pleins de lumière et de dynamisme. Chez Medardo Rosso, s’ajoute le fait que ses œuvres semblent nées de plâtre et de bronze. Le procédé se retrouve chez Dierickx, mais avec de la peinture. Un enchevêtrement de coups de brosse ainsi qu’un jeu d’éclairs, d’ondes et d’agglutinations génèrent un tableau de Dierickx. A l’origine était la peinture, et le chaos donne naissance à des formes vaguement reconnaissables. La peinture se mue en quelques fruits, la couleur se densifie pour former l’horizon, ou encore une tâche de couleur flottant sur la mer. Parfois, il s’agit d’une prolifération de formes, à d’autres moments, la couleur s’entasse dans un coin du tableau. Ses tableaux sont sans cesse en mouvement, en gestation. Ici réside le paradoxe de l’œuvre de Karel Dierickx. Images récurrentes Dierickx ne peint pas d’après des photos, films ou autres documents. Ce n’est pas un peintre conceptuel tel que Tuymans ni un peintre narrateur tel que Borremans. Dierickx peint de mémoire : ce sont des images récurrentes de ce qu’il a vu ou vécu. Les souvenirs d’une mer et le ressac, du soleil qui perce le brouillard, d’un visage, des fruits sur la table. Un de ses tableaux s’intitule d’ailleurs ‘Memory’. Les souvenirs sont souvent vagues. Ce n’est qu’en réfléchissant longtemps et, dans le cas du spectateur, en scrutant minutieusement, que l’image semble se préciser davantage. Pourtant, les souvenirs, ainsi que les scènes, semblent généralement insaisissables. Dierickx peint là où sa main le porte ; une main de maître qui ne craint pas la page blanche. Tout comme dans les tableaux de James Ensor, la lumière semble se trouver dans ses tableaux. L’enchevêtrement de couleurs claires évoque également l’œuvre tardive de Monet et ses variations sur les Nymphéas. Cependant, Monet voulait représenter la réalité visible, alors que Dierickx se désigne comme expressionniste lyrique. Nous pouvons sans doute aussi le voir comme un ‘impressionniste de l’âme’. Dans la Roberto Polo Gallery, ses œuvres figurent dans des cadres en bois, comme si elles se trouvaient dans une boîte vide, à offrir comme des cadeaux. En partant à leur découverte, vous verrez par vous-même qu’elles sont une fête pour les yeux.

  • Karel Dierickx | En pleine lumière, by Roger Pierre Turine | L'Eventail

    4/2/2014

    Belgium

  • Karel Dierickx | Je laisse ma peinture évoluer sous mes mains, en travaillant, by Marc Ruyters | H ART

    3/27/2014

    Belgium

    Traduction française ‘Hand Ballet’ de Karel Dierickx chez Roberto Polo ‘Je laisse ma peinture évoluer sous mes mains, en travaillant’ Décidément, le galeriste Roberto Polo ne voit aucune raison pour prendre du retard: l’artiste suivant pour lequel il organise une exposition solo est Karel Dierickx, l’une des éminences grises de la peinture belge, l’un des peintres les plus connus de l’expressionnisme lyrique. À la Roberto Polo Gallery, ce sont surtout ses dernières œuvres qu’il a voulu montrer. Marc RUYTERS Image: Karel Dierickx, ‘Dans le miroir’, 2013, huile sur toile, 60 x 50 cm, avec l’aimable autorisation de Roberto Polo Gallery D’abord il y avait Jan Vanriet, puis Koen De Cock, ensuite Bert Danckaert, Mil Ceulemans et Marc Maet. Maintenant, c’est au tour de Karel Dierickx, et bientôt suivront Michael de Kok, Karin Hanssen, Werner Mannaers ... la liste des artistes (en grande partie) belges que Roberto Polo sait ajouter à son portefeuille devient très impressionnante. Au début, quand il venait de s’installer à Bruxelles, la confrérie des artistes belges a réagi avec un soupçon de méfiance, mais jusqu’ici il n’y a pas eu de surprises désagréables – bien au contraire. Karel Dierickx vient de fêter son 74e anniversaire, mais il participe toujours et très régulièrement, à des expositions dans son propre pays (récemment au Musée de Deinze et de la région de la Lys et au Musée Roger Raveel). Il est surtout très présent en Allemagne, plus spécifiquement par le biais de sa galerie, Hachmeister à Münster. Comment se fait-il qu’il expose chez Roberto Polo aujourd’hui? Karel Dierickx: “Un jour, il a sonné à ma porte. Je ne le connaissais pas du tout. Alors, il a regardé mes œuvres les plus récentes, qui se trouvaient encore chez moi. Puisque la collaboration avec Hachmeister tire un peu à sa fin, je me disais: pourquoi pas?” Les œuvres qu’il montre chez Roberto Polo sont récentes ou plus précisément les tableaux sont récents, mais il y montre aussi des œuvres sur papier qui datent de périodes antérieures. BALLET DE MAINS Le titre ‘Hand Ballet’ vient de l’auteur Stefan Hertmans, qui a écrit le texte du catalogue. Un très beau titre, d’après nous. Est-ce qu’il signifie que, pour Dierickx, que les mains qui exécutent priment sur le cerveau créatif? Karel Dierickx: “Non, les deux vont de pair. Je suis un peintre assez typique des années quatre vingt: j’ai vécu une longue période pendant laquelle la peinture était considérée comme démodée, un peu ringarde. Toute notre génération en a souffert. ‘C’est en grande partie pour cette raison que je suis devenu un expressionniste lyrique. Je tente d’abandonner tout ce qui relève de l’anecdotique. Et en effet, à ces moments-là, c’est surtout ma main qui ‘mène le jeu’, car mon cerveau est ‘éteint’: quand je peins, je ne veux pas théoriser, ni exécuter tel ou tel concept. Aucun de mes tableaux n’est basé sur des faits ou sur une histoire - contrairement à ceux de la génération suivante.’ ‘J’ai eu beaucoup de difficulté à m’imposer – à survivre, même. Puis à un certain moment, j’ai fait la connaissance de Hachmeister. Il m’a pris en charge à une époque où, ici à Gand, il n’y avait, pour ainsi dire, plus rien à espérer pour des artistes comme moi. J’ai eu de la chance. C’est pour cette raison que beaucoup de mes œuvres se trouvent dans des collections allemandes. La présente exposition sera peut-être une nouvelle chance en Belgique pour moi.” Karel Dierickx a enseigné la peinture à Marc Maet, le peintre que Roberto Polo a exposé juste avant lui. Avec Philippe Vandenberg, Fik Van Gestel et Thé van Bergen, Maet formait un groupe de peintres qui pratiquaient une nouvelle variante de l’expressionnisme lyrique, suivant la trace des ‘Neue Wilde’ en Allemagne. Dierickx: “J’ai dix ans de plus qu’eux, mais j’étais en effet influencé par cette génération-là. Je me suis mis à peindre dans un style plus lyrique. Pour moi, c’était une expérience très agréable: voilà une génération qui osait à nouveau tenir un pinceau! Mais pour en revenir à ce ‘Ballet de Mains’: pour moi, en effet, un tableau évolue pendant que je travaille: une nature morte peut devenir un paysage, par exemple. La picturalité et la composition d’une toile peuvent aussi évoluer ‘en cours de route’. Pour la génération suivante, celle de Borremans et Tuymans etc., la composition est probablement figée dès le début, puisqu’ils travaillent d’après des photos, des documents, des séquences de film ...” TRANSCENDER Le dessin a une fonction préparatoire essentielle pour Karel Dierickx. “Ce qui était d’ailleurs encouragé par Hachmeister. Beaucoup de mes dessins se trouvent dans des musées allemands. L’acte de dessiner est plus décontracté pour moi que celui de peindre. J’ai une certaine facilité… Beaucoup de mes tableaux sont basés sur des dessins préalables, mais il y a aussi des dessins autonomes, des carnets illustrés, des gouaches… Je dessine plus que je ne peins.” Dierickx fait des paysages, des natures mortes et des portraits qui évoluent vers l’abstraction lyrique. Mais ce qu’il fait est plus que de l’abstraction. Dierickx: “Tout d’abord: la technique est importante. Il faut avoir du métier. Mais en tant qu’artiste peintre, il faut transcender l’aspect technique, il faut savoir oublier la technique. Gustave De Smet faisait cela merveilleusement bien. Il ne s’agit donc pas de l’abstraction en soi, mais bien d’une interprétation plus libre du thème, de l’aspect lyrique. D’où le fait que je me considère comme un expressionniste lyrique, en grande partie. Je tente de me libérer de tout ce qui relève de l’anecdotique. Et en effet, à ces moments-là, c’est surtout ma main qui ‘mène le jeu’, car mon cerveau est ‘éteint’: quand je peins, je ne veux pas théoriser, ni exécuter tel ou tel concept. Aucun de mes tableaux n’est basé sur des faits ou sur une histoire - contrairement à ceux de la génération suivante.” N’est-il pas difficile de savoir comment finir une telle œuvre, qui est par définition assez diffuse? Dierickx: “Oui, c’est bien plus facile de la commencer que de la finir, comme le veut le cliché.” La question le rappelle une anecdote mettant en vedette feu le regretté Jan Hoet. Ils ont toujours entretenu de bonnes relations, Karel Dierickx étant un des rares peintres que Hoet a toujours et dès le début inclus dans ses expositions. Dierickx: “Il est venu me voir dans mon atelier deux, trois mois avant sa mort. Il voulait voir mes dernières œuvres, celles qui sont exposées chez Roberto Polo en ce moment. Et il me disait: ‘Regarde, Karel, ceci est un beau tableau. Sauf que, moi, je ferais encore quelque chose là…’. Cela, c’était bien Jan Hoet, c’était tout à fait typique. Mais il ne m’a jamais laissé tomber, comme il l’a fait avec certains autres.” ‘Ballet de mains’ de Karel Dierickx, du 28 mars au 18 mai à la Roberto Polo Gallery, 8-10 rue Lebeau, Bruxelles. Ouvert mar-ven de 14 à18 h, sam-dim de 11 à 18 h. www.robertopologallery.com

  • SUMMER


    6/13/2015 - 9/6/2015


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


  • KAREL DIERICKX | Roger Raveelmuseum, Machelen-Zulte


    6/28/2015 - 10/11/2015


    Roger Raveelmuseum, Gildestraat 2

    Belgium


    Study after Small Monument for a Bird (2), 2013, mixed media on paper, 30 x 30 cm

  • KAREL DIERICKX | HAND BALLET


    3/28/2014 - 5/18/2014


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


    The Layers of Time, 2004, oil on canvas, 60 x 50 cm