Roberto Polo Gallery

The Gallery will close for Easter on Sunday, April 16th, 2017;

Stephen Snoddy

  • Untitled 63

Artist Statement

Stephen Snoddy wants viewers to look at the relationships between his paintings, and how he carries lines and formats from one over to another. He sometimes regards two consecutive paintings as a diptych, with left and right-hand panels forming parts of a composite whole. There is an obsessive commitment to playing out endless permutations of specific forms, and he goes along with an ontological methodology. The painting becomes defined by its geometries, serial approach, and limitless variations. In his own words, The paintings often come in pairs or a small series and incorporate architectural and geometric structures with colour to get everything right – space, line, form. The final result is a balanced resolution made through corrections, revisions and re-workings.

Snoddy always starts a painting by picking up on elements from a previous one. Then he constructs a multi-lined grid, and the interjection of these lines helps him to arrive at a new painting. While this sounds methodical, intuition plays its part, and is revealed in the pentimenti inherent in the act of painting. But he is even more convinced that structure is the absolute key to a fully considered and contemplative painting. He invites us to think about process, and work out for ourselves how the images have been arrived at. He says, I would hope that the paintings reward looking at to induce a slow, inexorable awareness of intricate relationships and through the reworking of the paintings glimpses of the decision making reveal themselves.


Richard Cork

  • Stephen Snoddy | Looking Out | L'Eventail

    3/12/2016

    Belgium

  • 'Les constructions chromatiques de Snoddy', by Roger Pierre Turine | La Libre | Arts Libre

    2/5/2016

    Belgium

    Snoddy’s chromatic constructions WEEK OF 5 TO 11 FEBRUARY 2016 ARTS LIBRE Faced with Snoddy’s paintings, the viewer is immediately struck by their zeal for rigour, their simplicity - notwithstanding a profusion of planes and volumes crossing and sometimes catching up with each other again, and that jointly celebrate a simultaneously plastic and musical symphony. For Snoddy’s colours, which are for the most part very elaborated, pure, subtle and light, are subdued, never glaring or loud, but shimmering with transparencies. They seem to be washed out, shivering. Rectangles, squares, lozenges and geometric shapes… and, from yellow to green, from red to black, from blue to grey, there’s a mingling of shapes going on, of colour planes and lines that deceive the eye, as they either cut up or reveal the perspective. Add to this Snoddy’s depths of field, worm’s eye views and bird’s eye views and there you have, layer upon layer, the ingredients of a painting style that is innovative, yet embedded in the continuity of certain types of constructivism. Angles and tangents Stephen Snoddy is a great colourist and this primary quality of his emerges instinctively. His paintings release a kind of impulsive enjoyment that immediately catches the complicit eye of those who appreciate the pristine light in springtime… Stephen Snoddy revels in painting. No need to be a great diviner to guess as much, even if it may seem presumptuous to assert this without ever having met him. His painting is like a song of vibrant chords punctuated by notes of winged colourfulness. You can feel him instinctively juggling angles, straight lines, perspectives and tangents. Even, at times, some crooked, untidy straight lines. Hence the spectator’s tenacious and lingering impression that these paintings are surges of spring, inhabited by the painting. In Snoddy’s presence, painting is smiling, enjoying itself, without for that matter ever getting distracted from the beauty of his line constructions. His paintings are kaleidoscopes, featuring lines that may be neat yet may also be blurred, like the ones on the upper floor that present themselves in a bolder, or in any case less rigid vein, with a halo of colours seemingly spreading all over, and vertical and horizontal lines only serving to perfect an atmosphere of deep infatuation with freedom. Painting that breathes Snoddy’s exhibition, entitled “Looking Out”, features some 50 paintings: acrylics, watercolours, gouaches and monotypes, all on paper, mounted on plywood. We are told that pictorial innovation is his credo, and finding new shapes and structures is his mission. We are also informed that he is fascinated with the works of Matisse, Brice Marden and Rothko, which, in view of his own work, is not too hard to imagine. Snoddy is a painter with aspirations and his painting, which is personal and sensitive, breathes. The catalogue text for this exhibition is by Richard Cork, the English historian and art critic famous for his art chronicles on the radio. According to him, “Snoddy’s work is characterised by an exactingness as to the pictorial procedure that is a quite complex premise: the painting should not be purely conceptual, nor present itself as completely fortuitous. It should issue both from a natural, organic process and from a subtle command of the gesture”. The pleasure proffered by such works is in line with his creative process. This is an indisputable and beautiful discovery. Roger Pierre Turine Left: Snoddy, Untitled 100 (after Matisse), 2015, mixed media on paper, mounted on plywood panel 46,6 x 66,6 cm. Upper right: Snoddy, Untitled 97 (after Matisse), 2015, mixed media on paper, mounted on plywood panel, 104,1 x 122 cm. Lower right: Snoddy, Untitled 109, 2015, mixed media on paper, mounted on plywood panel 40,1 x 32,6 cm. "Stephen Snoddy, who is fascinated by architecture, shows meticulous attention to the proportions and disposition of his pictorial elements.” Richard Cork Info Roberto Polo Gallery, 8-12, rue Lebeau, 1000 Brussels. Until March 13th, Tuesdays to Fridays, 14 – 18pm; Saturdays and Sundays, 11 – 18pm. Catalogue. Info: 02.502.56.50 and www.robertopologallery.com Short Bio Born in Belfast in 1958. Lives and works in Manchester. Graduated at the College of Art in Belfast. Had a long career as a director of museums of contemporary art in England. Took up his artistic career again in 2012.

  • SUMMER


    6/13/2015 - 9/6/2015


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


  • STEPHEN SNODDY | LOOKING OUT


    1/15/2016 - 3/13/2016


    Rue Lebeau 8-12
    Brussels
    Belgium


    Untitled 109, 2015, mixed media on paper mounted on blockboard, 40.1 x 32.6 cm